Category: Bible Study Articles

Look Inside: Enhanced Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary

Posted by on 06/10/2014 in: , , ,

The Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary offers easy access to articles on people, places, things, and events in Scripture. Here are three ways you can use this comprehensive resource in The Bible Study App.

The first way is through the Split Window and Resource Guide.  Open your favorite Bible translation in the main window and the Resource Guide in the Split Window.  As you read through your Bible text, the Resource Guide searches through all the downloaded resources in your library to find related Bible study content.

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You’ll notice that the Resource Guide pulls related content from all of your downloaded resources.  If you scroll down the Resource Guide results, you will see the section headings “People,” “Places,” and “Topics.”  These headings give you the results of articles based on your downloaded resources.

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Tap or click on the person/place/topic you want to learn more about. I chose “Samaria” in this example.  The Bible Study App then brings you results from within the resources you have on your device.  This is where you will find the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary within the Resource Guide.

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You’ll notice that the resource has the words “Article to Samaria” underneath the book cover.  Tap/Click on the book cover and The Bible Study App will take you directly to the article within the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary.

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As you are reading the article, any Scripture references become hyperlinks that you can tap/click to view as a pop-out window:

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The Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary is a comprehensive resource with 5,000 articles by leading evangelical scholars.  There’s also 400 color illustrations, maps, and photos.  Here’s one example from the Samaria article we’ve been reading:

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android-samaria3pic       ipad-samaria-pic       windows-samariapic

The second way you can utilize the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary is as a traditional dictionary in The Bible Study App.  Just Tap/Click the “Go-To” button and scroll through this awesome resource as you would a hard-copy dictionary.

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With our Search feature, The Bible Study App takes the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary to another level. Tap/Click the “Search” icon and type the word you are looking for to find all of the references in the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary.

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The third way is to use the Bible Study App’s Lookup Feature. Tap and hold a word in the Bible text and an option menu bar will pop up.

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If you tap the “Lookup” button you’ll get “hits” from your resources on just that specific word. From here you can follow the same steps as you would in the resource guide option above.

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As you can see, the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary is an extremely helpful resource for studying the Bible.

Browse Dictionaries and more titles enhanced for The Bible Study App’s Resource Guide.

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Enhanced Bible Dictionaries for Mobile Devices

Posted by on 06/09/2014 in: , , ,

What is the Resource Guide?  The Resource Guide is your personal research assistant within The Bible Study App.  When we say a resource is “enhanced” for the Resource Guide, it means it’s more than just a flat ebook that you read once and put away.  An enhanced resource is a powerful feature in The Bible Study App that you can use to find what you’re looking for easily and quickly.  Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias are two of the products that Olive Tree enhances for the Resource Guide.

Here are four ways The Bible Study App enhances Bible Dictionaries and Encyclopedias (screenshots are from an iPad 2 and a Nexus 7 – click on an image for a expanded view):

ONE:

Open your favorite Bible in the main window. (I’ve got the ESV open in this example.)  Tap the split window handle and drag it to a width or height you like.  As I scroll through the Bible text, the resource guide keeps up with me and searches through all the books in my library for content related to the Scripture passage in the main window.

If you scroll down the Resource Guide results, you will see the section headings “People,” “Places,” and “Topics.”

ios-split results splitwindow-topics

Tap or click on the person/place/topic you want to learn more about.  I chose “Altar” in this example.  The Bible Study App then brings you results from within the resources you have on your device.  I’m using the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible for our example.

ios-results android-altar results

You’ll see that the resource has the words “article to altar” underneath the book cover.  Tap/Click on the book cover and The Bible Study App will take you directly to the article within the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible.  After you’ve tapped on the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, you can scroll down and read the entire article without having to leave your Bible text.

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When you encounter a map, chart, image or photo, you can tap to bring up a closer view.

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If there are scripture references in the article, just tap the verse and it will appear in a pop-up window.

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You can also tap the top right-hand corner of the pop-up window to bring up the option to open these hyperlinked references in the main window or the split window.

TWO:

You can also utilize the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible as a traditional encyclopedia in The Bible Study App.  Just Tap/Click the “Go-To” button and scroll through this awesome resource as you would a hard-copy encyclopedia.

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THREE:

The Bible Study App Search feature takes the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible to another level. Tap/Click the “Search” icon (magnifying glass icon) and type the word you’re looking for to find all the references of that word in the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible.

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FOUR:

Tap and hold a word in the Bible text and an option menu bar will pop up.

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If you tap the “Lookup” button you’ll get “hits” from your resources on just that specific word. From here you can follow the same steps as you would in the resource guide option above.

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Go here see all Dictionaries & Encyclopedias available for the Bible Study App!

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Using the NA28 in The Bible Study App

Posted by on 05/30/2014 in: , ,

By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

Many features of The Bible Study App make the NA-28 easier to use, but using certain features of the text and the apparatus can still be confusing.  With that in mind, I’d like to explain how to do a few basic things with the NA-28 text with Critical Apparatus and Mounce parsings, available through the Bible Study App.  We also offer the NA28 with critical apparatus (but no parsings), and the NA28 with parsings (but no apparatus).  If you have one of these texts, you may still find this article helpful, but not all of the information will apply to the particular text that you have.

Using the Parsings
Accessing a parsing in the Bible Study App is as simple as tapping on a word.  A popup should then appear displaying the dictionary form of the word, followed by a link to a Greek-English dictionary, followed by a gloss, then the parsing information.  The parsing information is stored in the form of a code which is written out fully immediately below.android-morph

One feature that many users are not aware of is that the Bible Study App supports searching for specific forms of words by using these codes.  To do so, first check the “options” when you initiate a search.  You will need to have a parsed text open, and you will also need to switch the “search options” to “Search on Morphology.  Next, type in the dictionary form of the word, followed by the @ symbol, followed by the appropriate parsing code.  For example, searching for ἀγάπη@NNFS would return all occurrences of the noun ἀγάπη in the nominative singular.

At the bottom of the pop-up window, there is also a “lookup” button.  This queries other dictionaries in your library to find out if they have any articles about that word.  If they do, they will show up in the results.  Tapping on one will open that article in the popup window.  Often at this point, I will tap on the “tear out” button and choose to open the dictionary in the split window in order to read it more easily.  When I’m done, I simply tap the slider bar, which closes the split window.  The resource is still open there if I want to access it again, but it is out of view while I continue my reading.  If I want to open an article on another word, I repeat the process that I just outlined rather than opening the dictionary and trying to navigate to the entry I want.

Using the Critical Apparatus
There are two ways to access the critical apparatus in the Bible Study App.  The first is to tap on one of the text-critical symbols in the Greek text.  This will open the apparatus in a popup window to the corresponding location.  If you wish to keep the apparatus open in the split window, tap on the “tear-out” icon and select “open in split window”.android-criticalapp

I have pretty large fingers and find that I only hit the symbol about half the time.  When working with a parsed text, this can be obnoxious since I generally end up hitting the word and getting the parsing info rather than the apparatus.  In order to facilitate more easily opening the apparatus, we have included it as a separate item in your library.  This means that you can also get to it by opening the split window, clicking on the library button, and choosing the NA-28 Critical Apparatus from your library.

The critical apparatus has been “versified” which means that it will follow the main window (as long as your settings are set up this way).  It also means that when you tap on the “navigate” button that you will see the familiar verse chooser rather than a table of contents.  If the apparatus is left open in the split window with the Greek text in the main window, it will follow along as you read through a passage, providing an effect similar to reading from the print edition.

Probably the greatest obstacle to using the critical apparatus is becoming familiar with all of the symbols that it uses.  Unfortunately, we do not have these all tagged at this point, which means that there is no simple way to access the meanings.  However, we do include the introduction to the NA-28, which includes the definitions.  These are listed under “III. THE CRITICAL APPARATUS” in the introduction.  A simple hack which makes it much easier to jump to this section is to add a bookmark at this location.  It will then show up under the “My Stuff” menu in your bookmarks.  While this is not an ideal solution, it does help a lot when trying to look up symbols or abbreviations.  In fact, you could bookmark the sub-sections as well to make it even easier to get to exactly where you want each time.

See all Greek & Hebrew titles available for The Bible Study App HERE.

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Using the NA28 Apparatus as a Part of a Bible Study

Posted by on 05/29/2014 in: , , ,

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By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

I teach a weekly Bible study, and recently we were reading through the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7).  This has always been one of my favorite passages in the Scriptures and I was especially excited to get to the section on prayer and specifically to discuss the Lord’s Prayer.  I began by reading over the text of the passage itself.  I generally prepare my notes working from the Greek and Hebrew, but I then read from a number of different English translations in the study itself.  For this particular passage, I was reading from the ESV.  As soon as I had finished reading, someone pointed out that there was a line “missing” from the ESV at the end of the Lord’s Prayer.  She was using the NKJV, which adds the line “for yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever.  Amen” at the end of verse 13.  This question led to a discussion about why that line is in some translations but not others.

Since I started working for Olive Tree, I’ve transitioned to using almost entirely electronic texts of the Bible.  I had my notes and my Bibles there on my tablet, so I was able to quickly look up this addition in the NA28 critical apparatus.

The first thing that I noticed was a T-shaped symbol at the end of verse 13 in the main text.  If you consult section three in the introduction (“THE CRITICAL APPARATUS”), it is explained that this symbol means that one or more words is inserted by the manuscripts listed.  If you are unfamiliar with the apparatus, I would recommend that you simply memorize the list of symbols used.  I believe that there are only eight of them, and they indicate what is going on.  For example, a T-shaped symbol is used to indicate an addition, an O-shaped symbol is used to indicate an omission, an S-shaped symbol with a dot in it is used to indicate a transposition, and so on.  It should be kept in mind as well that “additions” and “omissions” are relative to the main text of the NA28.  An addition is material that the editors of the NA28 chose not to include in the main text, but that some manuscripts contain.  An omission is material that the editors of the NA28 included, but that some manuscripts do not contain.

Clicking on the symbol in the text will open a popup.  If you wish to open this in the split window, tap on the “tear out” icon in the top corner.  The first addition listed is simply the word αμην, which is found only in a few manuscripts.  As far as the abbreviations for manuscripts go, a Fraktur letter P followed by a superscript number is used to indicate papyri, uppercase Latin and Greek letters (and the Hebrew Alef) are used to indicate the different uncial manuscripts, and numbers are used for the miniscules.  There are also additional special abbreviations for medieval cursive manuscripts, lectionaries, the different versions (e.g. the Vulgate, the Peshitta, etc.), and citations in the Church Fathers.  These abbreviations are explained in the introduction, and more complete information about each of the manuscripts is given in Appendix I in the end matter.  The star next to 288 indicates an original reading that was subsequently corrected.   “Vg” stands for Vulgate and the abbreviation “cl” indicates that this reading is found specific in the Clementine Vulgate.  The take away here is that there is not much manuscript evidence for adding just the word αμην to the end verse 13. (more…)

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Look Inside: The Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB)

Posted by on 05/22/2014 in: , , ,

By Olive Tree Employee: Joe Carter

I’ve been a big fan of the Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB) from AMG Publishing House on Olive Tree’s Bible Study app for some time now.

This one resource in print actually takes 4 volumes:

  • The Complete Word Study Dictionary: Old Testament
  • The Complete Word Study Old Testament
  • The Complete Word Study Dictionary: New Testament
  • The Complete Word Study New Testament

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This is a massive original language study in one resource!

I love that you can search by the English, Greek, Hebrew, or by Strong’s Numbers! Even though I personally have limited knowledge about the underlying original languages, the CWSB allows me to read through the text in English, and quickly get in-depth info on any word there just by tapping on it!

The CWSB will give you information on the parts of speech for a word (and give you links that explain what those parts of speech mean if you don’t know – with examples no less!) – the Strong’s Number for that word, a VERY robust dictionary / exegetical discussion about the word in question as well as a link to a concordance at the end of nearly every entry showing you every verse in the Bible where a word is used.

Compare this resource to a standard “Strong’s” Bible and the amount of information available with the CWSB is staggering.

For example – the entry on αγαπαω:

In a Strong’s Bible you get this:

g0025. αγαπαω agapao;

perhaps from αγαν agan (much) (or compare h5689); to love (in a social or moral sense):— (be-) love (- ed). Compare 5368.

AV (142)- love 135, beloved 7;

of persons to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly of things to be well pleased, to be contented at or with a thing

By comparison, in the CWSB, the entry on αγαπαω goes on for over 2 pages when pasted into my word processor – with various usages of the word compared and contrasted between different passages of scripture.

Here’s a very small taste of the article on αγαπαω from the CWSB (comparing the different words for love used in Peter’s encounter with the resurrected Jesus in John 21 – FYI: Greek words in the text are transliterated into English for ease of use):

The third question of Jesus to Peter was different, “Do you love me [phileo, Are you my friend]?” (a. t.). Are your interests, now that you have seen Me risen from the dead, different than before the resurrection? Peter became sorrowful because he understood the deeper meaning of Jesus ‘question (John 21:17). His answer utilized two similar, but distinct verbs, oida, to know intuitively, and ginosko (G1097), to know experientially:”Lord, thou knowest, [oidas, intuitively] all things. Thou knowest [ginoskeis, know experientially] that I love thee [philo, that I am now your friend].”

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With this one resource you can get a backpack full of resources that you can carry around in your pocket – and instead of having to reference a number in one volume – then open another one and find that number, I can just tap on a word – then tap the links. Seamlessly moving between different ‘books’ in the collection.

As you can see, the Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB) is a great resource that helps you find original word meanings quickly and easily.

Watch the video below to see how the Complete Word Study Bible works on The Bible Study App.

You can find the Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB) on the Olive Tree Store here.

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Learning How to Study the Bible

Posted by on 05/01/2014 in: ,

ipad for teachingReading and studying the Bible are important disciplines for all Christians, but the concept of Bible study can be more elusive. In Rick Warren’s Bible Study Methods, Warren starts out by saying, “I have discovered that most Christians sincerely want to study their Bibles on their own, but they just don’t know how.”

There are many classes, books and seminars full of theories and methods to teach you how to study the Bible. I took a class in seminary called Principles of Inductive Bible Study, and to this day I can hear the professor’s voice in my head. Every day the professor would ask, “What’s the first step in inductive Bible study?” and as a class we had to respond in unison, “Observation!” Then he would ask, “What question do we ask in the first step of Inductive Bible Study” and in unison we would again respond, “What does the text say?!” Often he would repeat these questions over and over until he felt we responded enthusiastically enough. He drilled into us what he believed to be the right steps for inductive Bible study, but his was just one out of a multitude of Bible study methods.

I’d recommend taking a look at How to Read the Bible Book by Book and How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth by Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart as good introductory Bible study resources. Learn To Study The Bible by Andy Deane, and Knowing Scripture by R.C. Sproul are also helpful for picking up good Bible study tools and habits. Study Bibles, like the NIV Study Bible Notes can provide notes, cross references and other insights into the text to help you in your Bible study. I have several study Bibles, dictionaries, commentaries and other resources that I consult when studying a particular passage of Scripture. However, don’t get too bogged down with study books and miss out on the truths you can glean from digging into the text on your own.

Here are some things I do when studying the Bible (don’t worry; I won’t make you memorize these!):

Context, Context, Context

I start by looking for the historical context: the author, style of writing, time period, audience and the historical background that surrounds the text. I then focus on the biblical context. I read the previous and subsequent chapters to get a full picture of the passage. Finally, I look for how the passage is applicable to my life.

Absorb It

I like to read the passage through three times. I write down repeated words or phrases, metaphors, similes, exclamations or anything that stands out. If anything reminds me of another passage I’ll look it up and compare. I like to pick out a couple of the repeated words and phrases for a quick word study, looking for other places those words are used in Scripture using my Strong’s Bible.

Retain It

I like to re-write the passage of Scripture in my own words, taking into account all of the work I’ve done up to this point. I then summarize my study in three sentences or less. I’m terrible at memorizing Scripture, but I’ve found that re-writing the passage in my own words helps me to recall the verse, even if it isn’t exact.

Do you have steps for Bible study that you follow? Is there a resource that you find especially helpful for your study? Let us know by leaving us a comment.

See more Resources to Help you Study The Bible HERE.

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A Well-Rounded Bible Study Library

Posted by on 04/25/2014 in: , ,

Digital Library Tablet

People sometimes ask me what I would suggest for their Bible study library.  While this is a difficult question, many Bible teachers point to the same basic resources to make a well-rounded library.

1. Bibles

Sorry to be Captain Obvious here, but you need a Bible.  The most important component of a Bible Study library is a solid Bible text. I also suggest two or more translations to allow for a “Bible Translation Comparison” Bible Study method.

Here’s a short list of Bibles available for The Bible Study App:

2. Cross References

After you’ve thoroughly read the scriptures for yourself, read all of the related verses for that text.  The Bible Study App has some great resources to help you find all of the cross references.  These are helpful because they will save you tons of time and effort just looking up the references.

Recommendations:

3. Bible Concordances
Concordances are great tools that give you a list of verses that contain that root word in the Bible.  However, be careful that you do not JUST use a concordance in your preparation.  Concordances are a great place to BEGIN, but are never the END of your Bible Study.

With that “don’t try this at home” disclaimer, I do suggest using a digital Bible with Strong’s numbers integrated into the text for your Bible study.

Recommendations:

4. Bible Dictionaries
Dictionaries give you more explanation and meaning for specific words.  They also help us to keep our Bible Study on track.

Recommendations:

5. Bible Study Notes
There are multiple Bibles that have study notes written by scholars and trusted authors that will assist you in better understanding the Bible.  I recommend choosing one that corresponds to your preferred translation (KJV, ESV, NIV, NLT, etc.)

Recommendations:

6. Bible Maps & Atlases 

We are far removed from Biblical times.  Bible maps and atlases help us visualize locations, actions, and events in the Bible.

Recommendations:

7. Bible Handbooks & Bible Commentaries
After you’ve studied the Bible for yourself, it is often helpful to read trusted Bible scholars to see how they explain the text you are reading. These resources are also helpful to explain difficult passages or clarify the meaning behind Bible customs and events.

Recommendations:

Olive Tree’s Bible Study Collections

To make it easier, Olive Tree has bundled collections of resources to help you dig deeper into God’s word.  These bundles give you the basic tools that you need like the study tools mentioned above. All of these wonderful resources are designed to be integrated into the Resource Guide within The Bible Study App for a seamless and easy-to-use Bible study experience.

Bible Study Essentials 

  • Choose from the following Bible Translations: NIV, NRSV, NKJV or HCSB
  • A Study Bible that corresponds to your Preferred Bible Translation
  • Bible Dictionary
  • Cross-References
  • Maps

Bible Study Standard 

  • Everything in the Essentials bundle
  • Strong’s Tagged Bible
  • Essential Bible Companion
  • Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
  • Expanded Maps

Bible Study Expanded 

  • Everything in the Standard bundle
  • Key Word Commentary
  • Expository Dictionary
  • Bible Concordance
  • and even more Maps

Bible Study Premier

  • Everything in the Expanded bundle
  • More Commentaries
  • Bible Encyclopedia
  • More Cross-references
  • A Bible Atlas

Using these and tools will deepen your Bible study and further prepare you to present God’s word (2 Timothy 2:15).

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A Few Easter Resources

Posted by on 04/14/2014 in: , ,

Religious Easter Poster - Vintage style religious Easter poster,Easter is less than a week away.  As we prepare our hearts and minds for remembering the death, burial and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, here are a few resources that might help in your final preparations.

Evidence for the Resurrection

The bestselling Evidence for the Resurrection answers each question and addresses each theory with historical, archaeological, and cultural proofs. It presents evidence and logic that has convinced critics over the years and will equip you to with the right information when you talk to someone who questions the resurrection story.

Christ in the Passover

Christ in the Passover looks at the origins and symbolism of the Passover and how the Old Testament Passover is relevant today through God’s Son, Jesus. Christ in the Passover shows six ways that the Passover in the Old Testament points to Jesus, who was called the “Lamb of God.”

Feasts of the Bible

Feasts of the Bible celebrates and explains the meaning behind the different feasts and why they are important to God. It contains an easy-to-read chart that provides the name and an explanation of each holiday, date of observance, and reveals how each holiday points to Jesus as the promised Messiah.

Names of Jesus

The Names of Jesus is a bestselling tool for learning the names, character and personal attributes of Jesus. The 50 names are featured in an easy-to-use format along with their Scripture references, the meanings of each name, related titles, and more. Interestingly, the names of Jesus come from both the Old and New Testaments.

Gospel Transformation Bible Notes

Produced out of the conviction that the Bible is a unified message of God’s grace culminating in Jesus, it is a significant new tool to help readers see Christ in all the Bible, and grace for all of life. The Gospel Transformation Bible Notes features specially prepared material outlines passage-by-passage God’s redemptive purposes of grace that echo all through Scripture and culminate in Christ. The notes not only explain but also apply the text in a grace-centered way.

Christ’s Words from the Cross

Charles Haddon Spurgeon discusses the seven words that Christ uttered from the Cross: Forgiveness, Salvation, Affection, Anguish, Suffering, Victory, and Contentment.

Preaching the Cross

Preaching the Cross is an inspiring book containing the reflections of experienced pastors, and dedicated to “the next generation of preachers of the cross.” Collected and introduced by Mark Dever, each chapter of this book addresses a different issue in the lives and ministries of contemporary pastors.

101 Things Jesus Has Done for You

Combining scripture, quotes, and brief but powerful meditations, readers will discover the greatest gift that Jesus Christ offers to us is found in eternal life, but there are so many more things He has done for us – and does for us – when we enter into relationship with Him.

He Chose the Nails

Max Lucado examines the symbols surrounding Christ’s crucifixion, revealing the claims of the cross and asserting that if they are true, then Christianity itself is true. The supporting evidence either makes the cross the single biggest hoax of all time, or the hope of all humanity.

Death By Love: Letters from the Cross

Death by Love is a unique book on the cross of Jesus Christ. While many books debate the finer points of the doctrine of the atonement, what is often lost are the real-life implications of Jesus’ death on the cross for those who have sinned and have been sinned against. Written in the form of pastoral letters, Death by Love outlines the twelve primary effects of Jesus’ death on the cross and connects each to the life of a different individual.

Jesus, the Only Way to God

In Jesus: The Only Way to God–Must You Hear the Gospel to Be Saved? John Piper offers a timely plea for the evangelical church to consider what is at stake in surrendering the unique, universal place of Jesus in salvation. If you’re concerned about the current state of evangelism–and the church–this book is a must-read.

We hope that you find these titles not only helpful, but also inspiring and encouraging.

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