Category: Look Inside

Look Inside the Complete Word Study Bible

Posted by on 12/08/2017 in:

The Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB) from AMG Publishing House is a powerhouse resource in the Olive Tree Bible App.

In print, this title takes up 4 whole volumes:

  • The Complete Word Study Dictionary: Old Testament
  • The Complete Word Study Old Testament
  • The Complete Word Study Dictionary: New Testament
  • The Complete Word Study New Testamentcwsb plain

This is a massive original language study in one resource!

WHY OUR EMPLOYEES LOVE THIS RESOURCE

“I love that you can search by the English, Greek, Hebrew, or by Strong’s Numbers! Even though I personally have limited knowledge about the underlying original languages, the CWSB allows me to read through the text in English, and quickly get in-depth info on any word there just by tapping on it!

The CWSB will give you information on the parts of speech for a word (and give you links that explain what those parts of speech mean if you don’t know – with examples no less!) – the Strong’s Number for that word, a VERY robust dictionary / exegetical discussion about the word in question as well as a link to a concordance at the end of nearly every entry showing you every verse in the Bible where a word is used.” — Joe Carter

COMPARE CWSB TO STRONG’S

Compare this resource to a standard “Strong’s” Bible and the amount of information available with the CWSB is staggering.

As an example, let’s look at the entry on αγαπαω. In a Strong’s Bible you get this:

g0025. αγαπαω agapao;
perhaps from αγαν agan (much) (or compare h5689); to love (in a social or moral sense):— (be-) love (- ed). Compare 5368.
AV (142)- love 135, beloved 7;
of persons to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly of things to be well pleased, to be contented at or with a thing

By comparison, in the CWSB, the entry on αγαπαω goes on for over 2 pages when pasted into a Word document – with various usages of the word compared and contrasted between different passages of scripture.

Here’s a very small taste of the article on αγαπαω from the CWSB (comparing the different words for love used in Peter’s encounter with the resurrected Jesus in John 21 – FYI: Greek words in the text are transliterated into English for ease of use):

The third question of Jesus to Peter was different, “Do you love me [phileo, Are you my friend]?” (a. t.). Are your interests, now that you have seen Me risen from the dead, different than before the resurrection? Peter became sorrowful because he understood the deeper meaning of Jesus ‘question (John 21:17).

His answer utilized two similar, but distinct verbs, oida, to know intuitively, and ginosko (G1097), to know experientially:”Lord, thou knowest, [oidas, intuitively] all things. Thou knowest [ginoskeis, know experientially] that I love thee [philo, that I am now your friend].”

AN ACADEMIC LIBRARY IN YOUR POCKET

With this one resource you can get a backpack full of resources that you can carry around in your pocket. You don’t have to open up several volumes of books, hold your finger in a spot you want to save, or even flip a page. Simply tap a word, and tap the links. You can seamlessly move between all the volumes in the collection.

LEARN MORE

As you can see, the Complete Word Study Bible (CWSB) is a great resource that helps you find original word meanings quickly and easily.

You can learn more and purchase the CWSB by visiting the Olive Tree website here.

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Look Inside the BE Series Commentary

Posted by on 12/04/2017 in:

This set brings the 50 volume Old Testament and New Testament BE Series Commentaries together with all the life-changing truth of the Scriptures combined with the personal wisdom of one of America’s best-known Bible teachers, Dr. Warren W. Wiersbe.

He was a pastor at Moody Church in Chicago and served for ten years as General Director and Bible Teacher for Back to the Bible. Currently at age 88, he has written over 80 books. Wiersbe has spent his life contributing to the spiritual growth of the church, and that passion is reflected in this series.

WHAT’S INSIDE THE BE SERIES?

Whether you are a pastor, teacher, or layperson, now you can study the Bible in easy-to-read sections offering biblical insights and personal application.

The Be Series contains:

  • Dr. Wiersbe’s trustworthy historical explanations and insights on the entire Old and New Testaments
  • Introductions and outlines for each book of the Bible
  • Clear, readable text which is free of academic jargon
  • Questions for personal reflection or group discussion

LET’S TAKE A LOOK INSIDE!


The BE Series Commentary will follow along as you read the Bible.

It has helpful questions for discussion and deeper thinking.

You can easily navigate between all 50 volumes.

There are outlines, introductions, and notes from the author.

You can open references in a pop-up window for quick reading.

You can also open a pop-up window inside the Study Center.

LEARN MORE

Head on over to olivetree.com to learn more about this resource! You can also tap on any of the photos above to enlarge them. Plus, be on the lookout, because later this week we will be posting an excerpt from the BE Series on our blog.

Go look at the BE Series now!

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How To: Dictionaries in the App

Posted by on 11/28/2017 in: ,

The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD), complete 5-volume set, is the definitive starting point for research on any topic, place or person in the Bible, with emphasis on the crucial theological concepts. Based on the NRSV, the NIBD is a balanced and relevant Bible study resource for any pastor, teacher, or student who is preparing to serve a congregation.

Here are three ways you can use this dictionary in the Olive Tree Bible App.

All of the screenshots are taken from our Mac app. But you can use this resource in all the same ways on your phone or tablet.

1) RESOURCE GUIDE

The first way is through the Split Window and Resource Guide.  Open your favorite Bible translation in the main window and the Resource Guide in the Split Window.  As you read through your Bible text, the Resource Guide searches through all the downloaded resources in your library to find related Bible study content.


You’ll notice that the Resource Guide pulls related content from all of your downloaded resources.  If you scroll down the Resource Guide results, you will see the section headings “People,” “Places,” and “Topics.”  These headings give you the results of articles based on your downloaded resources.

Click on the person/place/topic you want to learn more about. I chose “Nebo” in this example.  Our app then brings you results from within the resources you have on your device.  This is where you will find the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD) within the Resource Guide.

You’ll notice that the resource has the words “Article to Nebo” underneath the book cover.  Click on the book cover and you’ll go directly to the article within the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD). As you are reading the article, any Scripture references become hyperlinks that you can click to view as a pop-out window:

FUN FACT!

The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible was written by 900 scholars from 40 nations. It contains 7,100 original articles and 1,300 distinct cross-reference entries.  Here’s one example from the Mount Nebo article we’ve been reading:

2) A TRADITIONAL DICTIONARY

The second way you can utilize the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD)  is as a traditional dictionary in the Olive Tree Bible App.  Just pull down the Go To menu and scroll through this awesome resource as you would a hard-copy dictionary.

2) THE LOOKUP FEATURE

The third way is to use the Lookup Feature. Use your mouse to highlight a word and right-click in the Bible text, and an option menu bar will pop up.  If you select “Search full library for ‘Nebo’” button you’ll receive a list from your resources on just that specific word. From here you can follow the same steps as you would in the resource guide option above.

LEARN MORE

As you can see, the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible is an extremely helpful resource for studying the Bible in-depth. Whether you are using your smart phone, tablet, or laptop, you can have quick access to historical, biblical insights.

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The Greatness of Forgiveness

Posted by on 11/27/2017 in: ,

What does Matthew 18 teach us about forgiveness? We’re giving you a huge peek inside the renown Preacher’s Commentary because we love what it has to say!

THE NATURE OF FORGIVENESS

The nature of forgiveness is a most profound aspect of reconciling grace. Forgiveness is never easy; it is hard.

It is the most difficult thing in the universe. Forgiveness means that the forgiving person as the innocent one resolves his own wrath over the sin of the guilty one and lets the guilty one go free. To forgive means that one genuinely loves, and this love can move beyond the issue to the person, and that one cares more about the person than about what he or she has done. Forgiveness liberates. Forgiveness frees the person for the options of living. Our refusal to forgive is a power play that limits the offender, that holds the guilty “under one’s thumb,” or power.

But such forgiveness is always in relationship, hence the condition of repentance. It is not a package that one accepts and runs away with. It is only known in reconciliation.

THE NEED FOR FORGIVENESS

Following a sermon which I had preached in a meeting in western Pennsylvania, a gracious lawyer thanked me for the message, but then added, “I’m not a Christian; I’ve never accepted this idea of the innocent suffering for the guilty, this blood religion.”

I said, “Sir, I’m very sorry for you, for you can’t have a happy marriage, or a happy family, or any lasting friendships in your social relations.”

He responded with, “And why not?”

To this I replied, “Because you are not an angel, and you make mistakes, and as you make mistakes the only way in which people can keep on accepting you is if they, as innocent, will forgive your guilt and accept you. But you just told me that you don’t believe in the innocent suffering for the guilty!”

He was honest enough to say he would think this over. And he came back to the next meeting when I preached on the Cross, which showed in Jesus’ death the depth of God’s forgiveness as He absorbed His own wrath on our sin by His love and extended forgiveness.

FORGIVENESS IN MATTHEW

This is the remarkable truth of this story. Matthew says Peter asked how often we should forgive. In his question he goes beyond the rabbinic rule of three times and extends it to seven. But Jesus answered, “Not seven, but seventy times seven.”

Jesus taught that forgiveness is qualitative, not quantitative.

And that forgiveness takes the place of revenge. A man in Christ never reaches the limits of love (Rom. 13:8). The following points express:

  1. Forgiveness creates the deepest awareness of sin: we can’t change the facts.
  2. Forgiveness costs the innocent one, for he resolves the problem in love.
  3. Forgiveness conditions one to forgive others for he is forever accountable for his privilege of freedom.

AN EXPLANATION OF THE PARABLE

The statement, “The kingdom of heaven is like ” sets the parable in the context of divine grace.

A king, settling accounts with his servants, found one servant owing ten thousand talents. The amount is so great that there is no conceivable way in which he could pay. This is the equivalent of at least twelve million dollars in our currency. It was fifty million denarii, and one denarii was a normal daily wage. Herod’s annual income was only nine hundred talents. The tax on Galilee and Perea together was only two hundred talents, and this man owed ten thousand! Jesus is illustrating our debt to God as totally beyond our payment.

The king decided to collect what he could, and ordered the man and his family to be sold (see Josh. 7; 2 Kin. 4:1). But the man fell on his face and entreated the king for patience, promising to pay everything. With this attitude toward the impossible, the king had compassion on him and forgave him the debt.

Forgiveness was because of his attitude, not his ability. In view of the interpretation given earlier of the meaning of forgiveness, we note that the guilty man was liberated, and the innocent person, the King, paid the debt, for He crossed ten thousand talents off of his accounts! This is Jesus’ illustration of forgiveness.

JESUS ADDS A SEQUEL

But human nature is inclined to resent rather than to release, to be demanding rather than to forgive. And Jesus adds a sequel to the story.

The forgiven man, who should have lived accountably in gratitude for his freedom, went out and met a man who owed him a relatively small sum. The figure was one hundred denarii, about twenty dollars, 500,000 times less than the forgiven man’s debt; but even so he demanded payment. He took him by the throat, throttled or strangled him, demanding the money.

His debtor now fell at his feet, begged for patience as he had, promised to “pay all” with the same words the forgiven man had used in his own desperation. But he would not extend patience, and threw the man in prison until the debt should be paid.

The behavior was so scandalous that his fellow servants were shocked at his injustice and reported it. The king called him in, and placed his condemnation in the form of a question—“I forgave you all that debt because you begged me; should you not also have had compassion?” The king was angry, and measuring judgment by the same measure in which the man had treated his debtor, delivered him to the tortures of prison until he should pay.

THE PUNCH LINE

The punch line is, so will my heavenly Father do if you forgive not.

This is not a legalism, but states the expectation of responsible persons whose moral sense of responsibility will call them to express the forgiveness towards others that they have experienced from God. “Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man unto whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no guile” (Ps. 32:1–2, KJV).

Our joy in this gift of grace keeps us from ever holding it to ourselves. This is illustrated by David having longed for a drink of water from the well at Bethlehem, whereupon three of his men risked their lives and broke through the ranks of the Philistines and brought him a drink.

He said, in effect, “I cannot drink it; it is the price of blood,” and he poured it out as an offering to God (1 Chr. 11:16–19). It is this awareness of the cost of our own forgiveness that keeps us from audacity in relation to those we are called upon to forgive. We only extend God’s forgiveness.

Thus Matthew concludes the “fourth book” of Jesus’ teachings.

LEARN MORE

The Preacher’s Commentary gives an outline and introduction for each book of the Bible. Then, story by story, it provides fantastic commentary that makes the Bible applicable and easier to understand. This resource is great for teachers, small group leaders, and preacher’s, and those looking for new input into their quiet time.

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Life Lessons: Ephesians 2:1-22

Posted by on 11/27/2017 in: ,

SITUATION

The Ephesians forgot what God did to save them and to make them a part of his Body.

OBSERVATION

God’s mercy plucks us from the destruction of our countless sins and places us in Jesus Christ’s righteousness.

INSPIRATION

When I read a verse like Ephesians 2:4, I feel I have discovered God’s roadblock on one’s way to hell—[But God’s mercy is great.] He is so rich in mercy that none need perish, but individuals must come to God in his appointed way. I adore the mercy that had lovingkindness, pity and compassion on me. . . .

Let me give you a modern illustration of mercy in action.

One day, a Christian named Paul went into a coffee shop, sat on a stool, and ordered his lunch. When he began speaking to the man next to him, he realized that Fred was in deep spiritual need. After sharing the gospel with him, Paul arranged to meet him again. It was at the second meeting that Fred was converted. Then Paul began to disciple him on a one-on-one basis, and Fred grew in grace and in knowledge of the Lord Jesus.

But it wasn’t long before Fred learned that he had a life-threatening disease. He had to go to a convalescent hospital that was sadly substandard. Paul visited him regularly, bathed him, changed the sheets, and did other chores that the staff should have been doing. The night Fred died, Paul was holding him in his arms, whispering verses of Scripture in his ear. That’s mercy. It’s a wonderful thing to see that Godlike quality in a human life.

APPLICATION

Are there some people around you who slip through the cracks unnoticed? Is there a lonely widow? An insecure junior-high student? A struggling single mother? Pay these people a visit—bring flowers or another gift; invest some time in their lives.

EXPLORATION

To learn more about mercy, look at Matthew 5:7; Luke 6:36; and 2 Peter 3:9.

THE DEVOTIONAL BIBLE NOTES

The Devotional Bible Notes — Experience the Heart of Jesus is written by Max Lucado. Not only will you have access to plenty of life lessons (like the one you read above) but also several indexes to help you find verses for certain life situations. Some of these lists that Lucado provides are “When You Feel Depressed,” “When You Encounter Discrimination,” and “When You Need to Lead.”

To learn more about this resource, visit our website.

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Look Inside: Expositor’s Bible Commentary

Posted by on 11/23/2017 in: ,

WHAT IS IT?

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary is a Gold Medallion Christian Book Award-winning resource! It is considered a major contribution to the study and understanding of the Scriptures. This 12-volume reference work is a staple for seminary and college libraries. Without a doubt, it provides pastors and Bible students with the comprehensive, scholarly tools needed to exegete, teach, and proclaim the Word.

It was compiled between the years of 1976-1992 with 50 different authors contributing.

FROM THE AUTHOR

One of the best ways to know more about a commentary set is to hear from the author. Here is an introduction from Frank Gaebelein, the main editor:

Written primarily by expositors for expositors, [this series] aims to provide preachers, teachers, and students of the Bible with a new and comprehensive commentary on the books of the Old and New Testaments. Its stance is that of a scholarly evangelicalism committed to the divine inspiration, complete trustworthiness, and full authority of the Bible.

Its seventy-eight contributors come from the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, and Switzerland, and from various religious groups, including Anglican, Baptist, Brethren, Free, Independent, Methodist, Nazarene, Presbyterian, and Reformed churches…

Whatever else [the Bible] is—the greatest and most beautiful of books, the primary source of law and morality, the fountain of wisdom, and the infallible guide to life—the Bible is above all the inspired witness to Jesus Christ.

May this work fulfill its function of expounding the Scriptures with grace and clarity, so that its users may find that both Old and New Testaments do indeed lead to our Lord Jesus Christ, who alone could say, “I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full” (John 10:10).

Frank E. Gaebelein, the original Expositor’s Bible Commentary

HOW DOES IT WORK?

In the Olive Tree Bible App all of this content is easily accessed in the Resource Guide found in the split window. No matter which commentary you are using they both follow along with the scripture in your main window to give you easy access to expositional commentary, charts, outlines and more.

How does this affect you? It makes your study of God’s Word a smoother process. You don’t have to flip pages or have your desk full of open books. Instead, our app serves you the material you need, that is relevant to the passage your studying. We want to help you steward your time well!

Here’s a few screenshots of how the resource looks in our app.

Each number indicates relevant entries for the passage

Notes are just a tap away

Charts and outlines are easy to use

LEARN MORE

You can learn more about the Expositor’s Bible Commentary (12 Volumes) by visiting our website.

If you’re looking for a reliable, comprehensive commentary set, the price won’t get much better than this. Don’t forget that this discounted price is only good for our Black Friday sale!

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Which Expositor’s Commentary is Right for Me?

Posted by on 11/23/2017 in: ,

You may have noticed that we have two commentary sets that are nearly identical in title:

The 12-volume set is heavily discounted for our Black Friday sale, which is helpful—if you know what it is and why it will enhance your study of God’s Word. So, this blog post will explain just that: what is the Expositor’s Bible Commentary, what are the differences between the two, and how it will help you study deeper.

AUTHORSHIP

Both commentary sets have a strong evangelical influence while at the same time drawing from a broad diversity of churches, including Anglican, Baptist, Brethren, Methodist, Nazarene, Presbyterian, and Reformed.

The original Expositor’s Bible Commentary was compiled between the years of 1976-1992 with 50 different authors contributing.

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary – Revised Series is a 2012 update to the original that includes the work of 56 different authors – 30 of whom are new.

CONTENT

The original and the revised editions include the following content:

  • Comprehensive introductions
  • Short and precise bibliographies
  • Detailed outlines
  • Insightful expositions of passages and verses
  • Overviews of sections of Scripture to illuminate the big picture
  • Occasional reflections to give more detail on important issues
  • Notes on textual questions and special problems, placed close to the texts in question
  • Transliterations and translations of Hebrew and Greek words, enabling readers to understand even the more technical notes

Both sets use the NIV for its English text, but also refer freely to other translations and to the original languages. Each book of the Bible has, in addition to its exposition, an introduction, outline, and bibliography. They also include a balanced and respectful approach toward marked differences of opinion.

HOW IT WORKS

In the Olive Tree Bible App all of this content is easily accessed in the Resource Guide found in the split window. No matter which commentary you are using they both follow along with the scripture in your main window to give you easy access to expositional commentary, charts, outlines and more.

How does this affect you? It makes your study of God’s Word a smoother process. You don’t have to flip pages or have your desk full of open books. Instead, our app serves you the material you need, that is relevant to the passage your studying. We want to help you steward your time well!

Here’s a few screenshots of how the resource looks in our app.

Each number indicates relevant entries for the passage

Notes are just a tap away

Charts and outlines are easy to use

LEARN MORE

You can learn more about the Expositor’s Bible Commentary (12 Volumes) by visiting our website.

If you’re looking for a reliable, comprehensive commentary set, the price won’t get much better than this. Don’t forget that this discounted price is only good for our Black Friday sale!

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A Camel Through… What?

Posted by on 11/21/2017 in: ,

“Then Jesus said to His disciples, ‘Assuredly, I say to you that it is hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven. And again I say to you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.'” —Matthew 19:23

A CAMEL THROUGH… WHAT?

If you’ve read this passage before, you have probably pictured something like this:

But the Archaeological Study Bible notes have information on this passage that you have probably NEVER heard. At least, I hadn’t!

THE LEGEND OF THE NEEDLE’S EYE GATE

“Since the Middle Ages commentators have considered the possibility that Jesus’ statement concerning the ‘eye of a needle’ (Mt 19:24) may have been a reference to certain doors or gates that actually existed in his day. Some homes did in fact have large doors that would allow a fully loaded camel to enter into the courtyard. Since such doors were cumbersome and required great effort to open, there were often smaller doors cut within them, permitting easy passage of people and smaller animals into the house.

Some interpreters have argued that this smaller door was the ‘needle’s eye gate,’ while others have suggested that the needle’s eye referred to smaller doors within larger city gates, such as those at Jaffa and Hebron. Passage through the smaller gate, it was said, would have forced a camel to its knees. Thus, the point of Jesus’ teaching in verse 24 is supposedly that a rich man can enter the kingdom of heaven only if he falls down to his knees.” — Archaeological Study Bible notes

IS THE LEGEND TRUE?

“As illustrative as these theories are, they in fact diminish the force of Jesus’ words. The point is not that salvation is difficult without God but that it is impossible without him.

Jesus’ contrast of the largest animal known in Palestine with the smallest of holes created a vivid and memorable illustration. The fact that modern-day gates have been so named can most likely be attributed to the influence of this and similar statements within the Talmud and the Koran. In other words, the term “needle’s eye gate” most likely did not precede the teaching; rather, the popularity of the term evidently came about because of the teaching.

But in Jesus’ original setting, it is very likely that a needle’s eye was simply a needle’s eye and not a gate at all.” — Archaeological Study Bible notes

BE CAREFUL!

Lastly, the Archaeological Study Bible warns Bible readers to beware of legendary, pseudo-archaeological interpretations. Why? Because they can be misleading and undermine the true meaning of a Biblical text.

We should always be careful about what we believe! Refer to reliable resources (like this one!), ask lots of questions, and seek input.

LEARN MORE

Interested in more of what the Archaeological Study Bible has to offer? Great! Here are two ways to learn more:

  1. Visit our blog post What’s in the Archaeological Study Bible – simple enough!
  2. Visit our website to read the product description and watch a video on how study Bibles work in the app.

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What’s Inside the Archaeological Study Bible?

Posted by on 11/20/2017 in: ,

When I first heard about the Archaeological Study Bible, I wasn’t sure what to think.  My initial thought was how could there be an entire Bible devoted to archaeological study?  And honestly, how could a study Bible devoted to archaeological study not be a snoozer?

So, I got a copy of the Archaeological Study Bible and began looking through it.  Wow, was I impressed (and wrong)!

WHAT MAKES IT GREAT?

The Archaeological Study Bible is a great resource.  There are 520 articles covering five main categories:

  1. Archaeological Sites
  2. Cultural and Historical Notes
  3. Ancient Peoples and Lands
  4. Reliability of the Bible
  5. Ancient Texts and Artifacts.

IT’S  ENHANCED!

Additionally, our app enriches the Archaeological Study Bible. As you read through your Bible, the Study Center will keep you synced with your reading. If this study Bible has content related to the passage of the Bible you are reading, the Resource Guide will let you know.

Here’s an example of an article on the Zealots and Essenes:

SO MANY PHOTOS

Also included are almost 500 full-color photographs throughout the text.  Here’s two examples:

Throughout the text there are detailed charts like this one:

At the end of the Archaeological Study Bible there are several maps that help you get an idea of the placement of biblical events:

The authors of the Archaeological Study Bible also included detailed book introductions for every book of the Bible. Other study tools include a glossary, extensive concordance and several indexes to help you find articles relevant to your study.

LEARN MORE

As you can see, you can spend hours learning the historical background of the Bible and the settings in which biblical events took place.  The articles and pictures will give you insights into the Bible and make you feel like you could have been there. Interested? Check out the Archaeological Study Bible in our store.

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NEW! NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible

Posted by on 11/17/2017 in: ,

ANSWERS FOR TODAY

Have you ever wished that the Bible spoke directly about controversial issues we face today? The NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible hopes to bridge the gap between God’s instruction and today’s questions. But how?

The goal of this Bible is to inspire believers to Christlike thought, belief, speech, and action. It is intended to help Christians from all walks of life to live their lives according to biblical principles, using information and encouragement based on a wealth of resources from around the glove and from ancient times up to the present day.

Normally, when you have a question about a present-day issue, you have to thumb through your Bible hoping to find a passage that relates somehow. Or, it’s the other way around. Reading the Bible doesn’t always seem to speak to things related to today, and you’re stuck trying to make connections on your own.

With this study Bible, you can be pointed in a good direction, without leaving your Bible app.

WHAT’S INSIDE?

There are eight subject areas covered in this study Bible:

  1. Church
  2. Corruption
  3. Economics
  4. Education
  5. Family
  6. Government
  7. Sanctity of Life
  8. Virtue

Emmanuel A. Kampouris, the publisher of Kairos Journal, wrote this study Bible. The notes and features of the NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible are based on his extensive online resource. Each of the listed subject areas contain articles regarding controversial topics such as: Taxation, Evolution, Parenting, Abortion, and more.

Here is an example!

Here is a list of everything included in this resource:

  • Book Introductions: Provide key passages and background information for each book
  • Articles: Over 220 articles placed near relevant Scripture passages bring keen biblical insight to the current issues of the day
  • Quotations: Over 60 quotations from historical figures help you understand, first, that the issues of the day are not new; and second, that wise people throughout history have been challenged to live by biblical standards, just as we are today
  • Unapologetic Profiles: Over 40 profiles of historical figures inspire you with biblical faith lived out in the face of seemingly impossible circumstances
  • Indexes: Categorize each of the above features to assist you in a topical study
    of the issues that matter to you

HOW IT WORKS IN THE APP

As expected, this study Bible works in our Resource Guide. As you are reading the Bible in the main window, the Resource Guide will show you what study Bibles notes (and any other notes or articles!) from the NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible line-up with what you are reading.

Additionally. this study Bible can be used with any translation you own, unlike a paper Bible.

Meaningful Bible study can happen now, with just a tap.

LEARN MORE

Visit our website to learn more about the NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible.

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