Category: Look Inside

How To: Dictionaries in the App

Posted by on 12/28/2017 in: ,

HERE ARE 3 WAYS TO USE A BIBLE DICTIONARY WITH OLIVE TREE

All of the screenshots are taken from our Mac app. But you can use this resource in all the same ways on your phone or tablet.

1) RESOURCE GUIDE

The first way is through the Split Window and Resource Guide.  Open your favorite Bible translation in the main window and the Resource Guide in the Split Window.  As you read through your Bible text, the Resource Guide searches through all the downloaded resources in your library to find related Bible study content.


You’ll notice that the Resource Guide pulls related content from all of your downloaded resources.  If you scroll down the Resource Guide results, you will see the section headings “People,” “Places,” and “Topics.”  These headings give you the results of articles based on your downloaded resources.

Click on the person/place/topic you want to learn more about. I chose “Nebo” in this example.  Our app then brings you results from within the resources you have on your device.  We’ll look at theNew Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD) within the Resource Guide as an example.

You’ll notice that the resource has the words “Article to Nebo” underneath the book cover.  Click on the book cover and you’ll go directly to the article within the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (NIBD). As you are reading the article, any Scripture references become hyperlinks that you can click to view as a pop-out window:

2) A TRADITIONAL DICTIONARY

You can also use these dictionaries in a more traditional sense.  Just pull down the Go To menu and scroll through this awesome resource as you would a hard-copy dictionary.

2) THE LOOKUP FEATURE

The third way is to use the Lookup Feature. Use your mouse to highlight a word and right-click in the Bible text, and an option menu bar will pop up.  If you select “Search full library for ‘Nebo’” button you’ll receive a list from your resources on just that specific word. From here you can follow the same steps as you would in the resource guide option above.

PICK OUT A DICTIONARY

Head on over to our olivetree.com to see all of our dictionaries.

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Look Inside: Strong’s Tagged Bibles

Posted by on 12/27/2017 in: ,

GET INSIDE A STRONG’S TAGGED BIBLE

If you’ve ever used a Strong’s concordance before, you know that it requires a LOT of page flipping (and paper cuts if you aren’t careful!).

At Olive Tree, we decided that there had to be a better, faster, and easier way to do quick word studies.

So, we tagged our Bibles with Strong’s. What does that mean? Watch the video to find out. We hope you’ll be impressed.

PICK OUT A STRONG’S TAGGED BIBLE

Head on over to our olivetree.com to see all of our Strong’s Tagged Bibles!

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How To: Reading Plans & Devotionals

Posted by on 12/26/2017 in: ,

1) DEVOTIONALS VS. READING PLANS

When looking at enhanced devotionals on olivetree.com, you will quickly see what sets them apart from simple reading plans that walk through the Bible. These are well-crafted, thought-out devotional books that you might think to buy at a bookstore. They all contain great content meant to encourage and inspire you. Some devotionals pick a certain passage of Scripture to talk about each day. Meanwhile, other devotionals may be topical.

On our website, you will see familiar names like Ann Voskamp, Sarah Young, Franklin Graham, and Brian Simmons. You could start on a year-long devotional plan or work through a 40-day plan with your family.

2) WHAT ARE ENHANCED DEVOTIONALS?

This is where our addition of reading plans really improved the way certain devotionals work inside our app. Any devotional that is enhanced (see a full list here) can be read and tracked as a reading plan. All you have to do is head on over to the reading plan tab and start reading.

Enhanced devotionals will appear under “My Devotionals.”

Look at your assignments in advance.

Receive reminders and customize your plan in the settings. 

Read until you reach the “Completed Reading” button. Tap it to finish!

PICK OUT A DEVOTIONAL

Head on over to our olivetree.com to see all of our devotionals!

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How To: Study Bibles

Posted by on 12/25/2017 in: ,

3 WAYS OLIVE TREE MAKES STUDY BIBLES BETTER

1) USE WITH ANY TRANSLATION

When you purchase a study Bible with Olive Tree, you’re given two resources: study Bibles notes and the corresponding translation. Example: You purchase the ESV Study Bible. You can now read the ESV in the main window and the ESV study Bible notes in the Study Center. Want to read the NIV? You can still access the ESV Study Bibles notes!

2) READ MULTIPLE STUDY NOTES

Want to read more than one paper study Bible? You’ll have to have two huge books laid out in front of you (and do TWICE the page flipping). We’ve simplified the steps it takes to study the Bible well with the Resource Guide. You’ll be notified when you have study notes on a passage. Just tap and navigate quickly between all your resources.

3) USE ANYWHERE, ANYTIME

After you’ve downloaded your new study Bible notes, you’ll never have to use the Internet to access them again. That’s right—no WiFi required. You could read a study Bible on top of a mountain, in line at the bank, and waiting to pick your kids up from school… without carrying a huge book around with you.

PICK OUT A STUDY BIBLE

Head on over to our olivetree.com to see all of our study Bibles!

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An Update on the New American Commentary

Posted by on 12/18/2017 in: ,

Here’s some news! We just released a new version of our New American Commentary Old & New Testament Set. It now holds 42 volumes. You can visit our website here to see all of the volumes included, along with what ones are not available yet.

With this update, we thought it would be nice to share some information with you about this resource. We’ll even give you a look inside. Let’s start!

WHAT IS THE NAC?

The New American Commentary collects the best in contemporary evangelical scholarship in a series that examines the entire Bible in depth. Currently, it offers 18 volumes of commentary on the New Testament and 24 volumes of commentary on the Old Testament.

It based on the NIV Bible text and provides verse-by-verse analysis. Additionally, it is considered to be a mid-level commentary, relfecting comprehensive biblical research in the original languages of the Bible, but avoids using overly-technical language. That way, you don’t have to have a seminary background in order to understand.

The New American Commentary consistently supports the inerrancy of Scripture and contributing scholars all hold explicit commitments to Scripture’s infallibility. Its distinctive perspective is a focus on the theological ideas springing from Scripture.

Along with the textual grounding of an expository commentary, the New American Commentary also focuses on the broader strokes of theology developed by each book, and interprets each book as a theological unity. Rooted in conservative theology, this resource also directly engages a wide range of theological and exegetical issues raised by contemporary biblical scholarship.

A LOOK INSIDE

Every book comes with an outline and book introductions. You can easily navigate through the commentary set with the List View of our toolbar navigation.

You can read the commentary in the main window and open Scripture references and footnotes in a helpful pop-up window.

And as you are reading the Bible, the resource guide will let you know if the NAC has an article on the passage you are reading. All you’ll need to do tap, and it will open, following along with wherever you are in the main window.

If a verse in a different section is references in the commentary, you can still open a pop-up window to read it.

LEARN MORE

If you want to see how the commentary works in our app or learn about its contents, head on over to our website by clicking here.

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Look Inside the BE Series Commentary

Posted by on 12/04/2017 in:

This set brings the 50 volume Old Testament and New Testament BE Series Commentaries together with all the life-changing truth of the Scriptures combined with the personal wisdom of one of America’s best-known Bible teachers, Dr. Warren W. Wiersbe.

He was a pastor at Moody Church in Chicago and served for ten years as General Director and Bible Teacher for Back to the Bible. Currently at age 88, he has written over 80 books. Wiersbe has spent his life contributing to the spiritual growth of the church, and that passion is reflected in this series.

WHAT’S INSIDE THE BE SERIES?

Whether you are a pastor, teacher, or layperson, now you can study the Bible in easy-to-read sections offering biblical insights and personal application.

The Be Series contains:

  • Dr. Wiersbe’s trustworthy historical explanations and insights on the entire Old and New Testaments
  • Introductions and outlines for each book of the Bible
  • Clear, readable text which is free of academic jargon
  • Questions for personal reflection or group discussion

LET’S TAKE A LOOK INSIDE!


The BE Series Commentary will follow along as you read the Bible.

It has helpful questions for discussion and deeper thinking.

You can easily navigate between all 50 volumes.

There are outlines, introductions, and notes from the author.

You can open references in a pop-up window for quick reading.

You can also open a pop-up window inside the Study Center.

LEARN MORE

Head on over to olivetree.com to learn more about this resource! You can also tap on any of the photos above to enlarge them. Plus, be on the lookout, because later this week we will be posting an excerpt from the BE Series on our blog.

Go look at the BE Series now!

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The Greatness of Forgiveness

Posted by on 11/27/2017 in: ,

What does Matthew 18 teach us about forgiveness? We’re giving you a huge peek inside the renown Preacher’s Commentary because we love what it has to say!

THE NATURE OF FORGIVENESS

The nature of forgiveness is a most profound aspect of reconciling grace. Forgiveness is never easy; it is hard.

It is the most difficult thing in the universe. Forgiveness means that the forgiving person as the innocent one resolves his own wrath over the sin of the guilty one and lets the guilty one go free. To forgive means that one genuinely loves, and this love can move beyond the issue to the person, and that one cares more about the person than about what he or she has done. Forgiveness liberates. Forgiveness frees the person for the options of living. Our refusal to forgive is a power play that limits the offender, that holds the guilty “under one’s thumb,” or power.

But such forgiveness is always in relationship, hence the condition of repentance. It is not a package that one accepts and runs away with. It is only known in reconciliation.

THE NEED FOR FORGIVENESS

Following a sermon which I had preached in a meeting in western Pennsylvania, a gracious lawyer thanked me for the message, but then added, “I’m not a Christian; I’ve never accepted this idea of the innocent suffering for the guilty, this blood religion.”

I said, “Sir, I’m very sorry for you, for you can’t have a happy marriage, or a happy family, or any lasting friendships in your social relations.”

He responded with, “And why not?”

To this I replied, “Because you are not an angel, and you make mistakes, and as you make mistakes the only way in which people can keep on accepting you is if they, as innocent, will forgive your guilt and accept you. But you just told me that you don’t believe in the innocent suffering for the guilty!”

He was honest enough to say he would think this over. And he came back to the next meeting when I preached on the Cross, which showed in Jesus’ death the depth of God’s forgiveness as He absorbed His own wrath on our sin by His love and extended forgiveness.

FORGIVENESS IN MATTHEW

This is the remarkable truth of this story. Matthew says Peter asked how often we should forgive. In his question he goes beyond the rabbinic rule of three times and extends it to seven. But Jesus answered, “Not seven, but seventy times seven.”

Jesus taught that forgiveness is qualitative, not quantitative.

And that forgiveness takes the place of revenge. A man in Christ never reaches the limits of love (Rom. 13:8). The following points express:

  1. Forgiveness creates the deepest awareness of sin: we can’t change the facts.
  2. Forgiveness costs the innocent one, for he resolves the problem in love.
  3. Forgiveness conditions one to forgive others for he is forever accountable for his privilege of freedom.

AN EXPLANATION OF THE PARABLE

The statement, “The kingdom of heaven is like ” sets the parable in the context of divine grace.

A king, settling accounts with his servants, found one servant owing ten thousand talents. The amount is so great that there is no conceivable way in which he could pay. This is the equivalent of at least twelve million dollars in our currency. It was fifty million denarii, and one denarii was a normal daily wage. Herod’s annual income was only nine hundred talents. The tax on Galilee and Perea together was only two hundred talents, and this man owed ten thousand! Jesus is illustrating our debt to God as totally beyond our payment.

The king decided to collect what he could, and ordered the man and his family to be sold (see Josh. 7; 2 Kin. 4:1). But the man fell on his face and entreated the king for patience, promising to pay everything. With this attitude toward the impossible, the king had compassion on him and forgave him the debt.

Forgiveness was because of his attitude, not his ability. In view of the interpretation given earlier of the meaning of forgiveness, we note that the guilty man was liberated, and the innocent person, the King, paid the debt, for He crossed ten thousand talents off of his accounts! This is Jesus’ illustration of forgiveness.

JESUS ADDS A SEQUEL

But human nature is inclined to resent rather than to release, to be demanding rather than to forgive. And Jesus adds a sequel to the story.

The forgiven man, who should have lived accountably in gratitude for his freedom, went out and met a man who owed him a relatively small sum. The figure was one hundred denarii, about twenty dollars, 500,000 times less than the forgiven man’s debt; but even so he demanded payment. He took him by the throat, throttled or strangled him, demanding the money.

His debtor now fell at his feet, begged for patience as he had, promised to “pay all” with the same words the forgiven man had used in his own desperation. But he would not extend patience, and threw the man in prison until the debt should be paid.

The behavior was so scandalous that his fellow servants were shocked at his injustice and reported it. The king called him in, and placed his condemnation in the form of a question—“I forgave you all that debt because you begged me; should you not also have had compassion?” The king was angry, and measuring judgment by the same measure in which the man had treated his debtor, delivered him to the tortures of prison until he should pay.

THE PUNCH LINE

The punch line is, so will my heavenly Father do if you forgive not.

This is not a legalism, but states the expectation of responsible persons whose moral sense of responsibility will call them to express the forgiveness towards others that they have experienced from God. “Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man unto whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no guile” (Ps. 32:1–2, KJV).

Our joy in this gift of grace keeps us from ever holding it to ourselves. This is illustrated by David having longed for a drink of water from the well at Bethlehem, whereupon three of his men risked their lives and broke through the ranks of the Philistines and brought him a drink.

He said, in effect, “I cannot drink it; it is the price of blood,” and he poured it out as an offering to God (1 Chr. 11:16–19). It is this awareness of the cost of our own forgiveness that keeps us from audacity in relation to those we are called upon to forgive. We only extend God’s forgiveness.

Thus Matthew concludes the “fourth book” of Jesus’ teachings.

LEARN MORE

The Preacher’s Commentary gives an outline and introduction for each book of the Bible. Then, story by story, it provides fantastic commentary that makes the Bible applicable and easier to understand. This resource is great for teachers, small group leaders, and preacher’s, and those looking for new input into their quiet time.

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Life Lessons: Ephesians 2:1-22

Posted by on 11/27/2017 in: ,

SITUATION

The Ephesians forgot what God did to save them and to make them a part of his Body.

OBSERVATION

God’s mercy plucks us from the destruction of our countless sins and places us in Jesus Christ’s righteousness.

INSPIRATION

When I read a verse like Ephesians 2:4, I feel I have discovered God’s roadblock on one’s way to hell—[But God’s mercy is great.] He is so rich in mercy that none need perish, but individuals must come to God in his appointed way. I adore the mercy that had lovingkindness, pity and compassion on me. . . .

Let me give you a modern illustration of mercy in action.

One day, a Christian named Paul went into a coffee shop, sat on a stool, and ordered his lunch. When he began speaking to the man next to him, he realized that Fred was in deep spiritual need. After sharing the gospel with him, Paul arranged to meet him again. It was at the second meeting that Fred was converted. Then Paul began to disciple him on a one-on-one basis, and Fred grew in grace and in knowledge of the Lord Jesus.

But it wasn’t long before Fred learned that he had a life-threatening disease. He had to go to a convalescent hospital that was sadly substandard. Paul visited him regularly, bathed him, changed the sheets, and did other chores that the staff should have been doing. The night Fred died, Paul was holding him in his arms, whispering verses of Scripture in his ear. That’s mercy. It’s a wonderful thing to see that Godlike quality in a human life.

APPLICATION

Are there some people around you who slip through the cracks unnoticed? Is there a lonely widow? An insecure junior-high student? A struggling single mother? Pay these people a visit—bring flowers or another gift; invest some time in their lives.

EXPLORATION

To learn more about mercy, look at Matthew 5:7; Luke 6:36; and 2 Peter 3:9.

THE DEVOTIONAL BIBLE NOTES

The Devotional Bible Notes — Experience the Heart of Jesus is written by Max Lucado. Not only will you have access to plenty of life lessons (like the one you read above) but also several indexes to help you find verses for certain life situations. Some of these lists that Lucado provides are “When You Feel Depressed,” “When You Encounter Discrimination,” and “When You Need to Lead.”

To learn more about this resource, visit our website.

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