Look Inside

Look Inside: A Visual Guide to Bible Events

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This week, Olive Tree has an awesome sale on A Visual Guide to Bible Events.  The book’s introduction states that its purpose is to be “a door through which to enter the world of the Bible and encounter the power and love of our Lord Jesus and the unity of Scripture.”

This resource does just that.  This book is not written in your typical research academic resource. Rather, it has a conversational tone to which any person can relate.  A Visual Guide to Bible Events is packed with over 500 photographs and maps brings a heightened awareness to the biblical text like no other.

For example, take the seven churches of Revelation.

sevenchurchesmap

With the addition of the map, you can visualize how John’s letter carrier would have made a circular trip and how closely the seven churches were geographically.  You can also see the length of the Israelites’ detour around Edom in Numbers 20:14–21 and Deuteronomy 2:1–8.

wildernessmap

Looking through the beautiful full-color photographs gives a sense of being “in the action” and gives a sense of realism and depth like no written resource could.

Another example is a section of the Jerusalem wall during Nehemiah’s time.

nehemiahwall

Or, seeing a scale model of the temple and envisioning what it would have been like to be with the early church in Solomon’s Colonnade.

templemodel

Perhaps even seeing a picture of an altar to an unknown God and how that would have affected the Apostle Paul.

unknowngod

Bible history told and shown in this context is insightful for all those wanting to deepen their Bible knowledge.  The Bible Study App enhances this resource to strengthen your Bible study.  As you’re reading through A Visual Guide to Bible Events, tap or click on a scripture reference to instantly see the Bible text.  You can also use the split screen feature to view the articles and pictures while reading your Bible to augment your daily reading.

This week you can pick up A Visual Guide to Bible Events and other resources enhanced for The Bible Study App on sale this week.

Enhanced Commentary Set: Expositor’s Bible Commentary Revised

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The Expositor’s Bible Commentary (Revised) is a comprehensive and succinct commentary that guides users to the text’s core meaning. It is a vital resource for every preacher, teacher, and student of the Bible.

In Olive Tree’s Bible Study App, the Expositors Bible Commentary comes to life! Verse references becomes hyperlinks, the split window allows you to read the Bible side-by-side with the commentary, and you can easily take notes and highlights within the text. Enhanced for use in the Resource Guide, let The Bible Study App simplify your study with the Expositor’s Bible Commentary.

See how this great commentary looks in The Bible Study App:

The Expositors Bible Commentary and other commentaries Enhanced for the Resource Guide are on sale right now!

How are Commentaries Enhanced for the Resource Guide?

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Bible Commentaries can be an extremely valuable study tools. Many commentaries include historical and culture context, theological interpretation, and other resources like timelines and charts. The resource guide of The Bible Study App makes using commentaries a seamless part of your study.

Watch the video below to see how commentaries work within The Bible Study App’s Resource Guide.

Browse this week’s highlighted commentaries!

Using the NA28 in The Bible Study App

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By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

Many features of The Bible Study App make the NA-28 easier to use, but using certain features of the text and the apparatus can still be confusing.  With that in mind, I’d like to explain how to do a few basic things with the NA-28 text with Critical Apparatus and Mounce parsings, available through the Bible Study App.  We also offer the NA28 with critical apparatus (but no parsings), and the NA28 with parsings (but no apparatus).  If you have one of these texts, you may still find this article helpful, but not all of the information will apply to the particular text that you have.

Using the Parsings
Accessing a parsing in the Bible Study App is as simple as tapping on a word.  A popup should then appear displaying the dictionary form of the word, followed by a link to a Greek-English dictionary, followed by a gloss, then the parsing information.  The parsing information is stored in the form of a code which is written out fully immediately below.android-morph

One feature that many users are not aware of is that the Bible Study App supports searching for specific forms of words by using these codes.  To do so, first check the “options” when you initiate a search.  You will need to have a parsed text open, and you will also need to switch the “search options” to “Search on Morphology.  Next, type in the dictionary form of the word, followed by the @ symbol, followed by the appropriate parsing code.  For example, searching for ἀγάπη@NNFS would return all occurrences of the noun ἀγάπη in the nominative singular.

At the bottom of the pop-up window, there is also a “lookup” button.  This queries other dictionaries in your library to find out if they have any articles about that word.  If they do, they will show up in the results.  Tapping on one will open that article in the popup window.  Often at this point, I will tap on the “tear out” button and choose to open the dictionary in the split window in order to read it more easily.  When I’m done, I simply tap the slider bar, which closes the split window.  The resource is still open there if I want to access it again, but it is out of view while I continue my reading.  If I want to open an article on another word, I repeat the process that I just outlined rather than opening the dictionary and trying to navigate to the entry I want.

Using the Critical Apparatus
There are two ways to access the critical apparatus in the Bible Study App.  The first is to tap on one of the text-critical symbols in the Greek text.  This will open the apparatus in a popup window to the corresponding location.  If you wish to keep the apparatus open in the split window, tap on the “tear-out” icon and select “open in split window”.android-criticalapp

I have pretty large fingers and find that I only hit the symbol about half the time.  When working with a parsed text, this can be obnoxious since I generally end up hitting the word and getting the parsing info rather than the apparatus.  In order to facilitate more easily opening the apparatus, we have included it as a separate item in your library.  This means that you can also get to it by opening the split window, clicking on the library button, and choosing the NA-28 Critical Apparatus from your library.

The critical apparatus has been “versified” which means that it will follow the main window (as long as your settings are set up this way).  It also means that when you tap on the “navigate” button that you will see the familiar verse chooser rather than a table of contents.  If the apparatus is left open in the split window with the Greek text in the main window, it will follow along as you read through a passage, providing an effect similar to reading from the print edition.

Probably the greatest obstacle to using the critical apparatus is becoming familiar with all of the symbols that it uses.  Unfortunately, we do not have these all tagged at this point, which means that there is no simple way to access the meanings.  However, we do include the introduction to the NA-28, which includes the definitions.  These are listed under “III. THE CRITICAL APPARATUS” in the introduction.  A simple hack which makes it much easier to jump to this section is to add a bookmark at this location.  It will then show up under the “My Stuff” menu in your bookmarks.  While this is not an ideal solution, it does help a lot when trying to look up symbols or abbreviations.  In fact, you could bookmark the sub-sections as well to make it even easier to get to exactly where you want each time.

See all Greek & Hebrew titles available for The Bible Study App HERE.

 

 

Using the NA28 Apparatus as a Part of a Bible Study

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NA28inabiblestudy

By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

I teach a weekly Bible study, and recently we were reading through the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7).  This has always been one of my favorite passages in the Scriptures and I was especially excited to get to the section on prayer and specifically to discuss the Lord’s Prayer.  I began by reading over the text of the passage itself.  I generally prepare my notes working from the Greek and Hebrew, but I then read from a number of different English translations in the study itself.  For this particular passage, I was reading from the ESV.  As soon as I had finished reading, someone pointed out that there was a line “missing” from the ESV at the end of the Lord’s Prayer.  She was using the NKJV, which adds the line “for yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever.  Amen” at the end of verse 13.  This question led to a discussion about why that line is in some translations but not others.

Since I started working for Olive Tree, I’ve transitioned to using almost entirely electronic texts of the Bible.  I had my notes and my Bibles there on my tablet, so I was able to quickly look up this addition in the NA28 critical apparatus.

The first thing that I noticed was a T-shaped symbol at the end of verse 13 in the main text.  If you consult section three in the introduction (“THE CRITICAL APPARATUS”), it is explained that this symbol means that one or more words is inserted by the manuscripts listed.  If you are unfamiliar with the apparatus, I would recommend that you simply memorize the list of symbols used.  I believe that there are only eight of them, and they indicate what is going on.  For example, a T-shaped symbol is used to indicate an addition, an O-shaped symbol is used to indicate an omission, an S-shaped symbol with a dot in it is used to indicate a transposition, and so on.  It should be kept in mind as well that “additions” and “omissions” are relative to the main text of the NA28.  An addition is material that the editors of the NA28 chose not to include in the main text, but that some manuscripts contain.  An omission is material that the editors of the NA28 included, but that some manuscripts do not contain.

Clicking on the symbol in the text will open a popup.  If you wish to open this in the split window, tap on the “tear out” icon in the top corner.  The first addition listed is simply the word αμην, which is found only in a few manuscripts.  As far as the abbreviations for manuscripts go, a Fraktur letter P followed by a superscript number is used to indicate papyri, uppercase Latin and Greek letters (and the Hebrew Alef) are used to indicate the different uncial manuscripts, and numbers are used for the miniscules.  There are also additional special abbreviations for medieval cursive manuscripts, lectionaries, the different versions (e.g. the Vulgate, the Peshitta, etc.), and citations in the Church Fathers.  These abbreviations are explained in the introduction, and more complete information about each of the manuscripts is given in Appendix I in the end matter.  The star next to 288 indicates an original reading that was subsequently corrected.   “Vg” stands for Vulgate and the abbreviation “cl” indicates that this reading is found specific in the Clementine Vulgate.  The take away here is that there is not much manuscript evidence for adding just the word αμην to the end verse 13. (more…)

Look Inside: NA28 Greek New Testament

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The Novum Testamentum Graece (NA28) sets a new standard among Greek New Testament editions with its revisions and improvements. In the Bible Study App by Olive Tree Bible Software the NA28 is an invaluable resource for those who want to study the original language of the New Testament.

Watch the video below to see how the NA28 works in The Bible Study app running on a Mac.

 

Go HERE to see all Greek & Hebrew Titles available for The Bible Study App!
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