Category: Product Reviews

A Commentary You Can Apply to Your Life

Posted by on 10/08/2017 in: ,

There’s a reason students call seminary, “cemetery.” When I think of my Bible college experience, I remember the thick, dry textbooks. The information usually felt distant: arguments about authorship, textual criticism, definitions of the Greek and Hebrew. Although I learned a lot about the Bible (it was a priceless experience, believe me), I often finished my reading assignments wondering what any of it had to do with my personal life. This is why academic Bible study can feel like a graveyard; the Bible can quickly become only an ancient text to study, instead of the life-transforming book that it is.

A DIFFERENT KIND OF COMMENTARY

Not all commentaries neglect this important aspect. Recently, I was reading through Mark and thought it would be nice to have some extra input in my Bible study. I remembered that this week we have the NIV Application Commentary on sale, and I’ve never opened it before. So, I tried it out!

Every section of Scripture is explained in three ways: Original Meaning, Bridging Contexts, and Contemporary Significance. I’ll give you an example from my own study:

MARK 9:30-50

This passage is outlined in four sections: The Second Prediction of Jesus Suffering and Resurrection (9;30-37), The Unfamiliar Exorcist (9:38-40), Warning About Causing Others to Stumble (9:42-48), and Salt (9:49-50). For the sake of trying to keep this blog short, we’ll look at the Unfamiliar Exorcist.

John proudly announces to Jesus that they saw someone casting out demons in his name and they obstructed him. Their reason for intervening? “Because he was not one of us.” The complaint drips with irony. The disciples only recently bungled an exorcism, yet they do not hesitate to obstruct someone who is successful but who is not a member of their team. Jesus catches them by surprise when he does not commend them for their vigilance but instead reproves them: “Do not stop him” (9:39).

This response recalls Moses’ reply to Joshua. Joshua implored Israel’s leader to do something about unauthorized prophets, “Moses, my lord, stop them!” Moses answered, “Are you jealous for my sake? I wish that all the Lord’s people were prophets and that the Lord would put his Spirit on them!” (Num. 11:26-29). Are the disciples jealous for Jesus or for themselves? Do they want to corner the exorcism market, which would make them indispensable and revered, whereas Jesus wishes that all were exorcists casting out Satan in his name?

In the ancient world, exorcists used whatever name of deities they thought would work. Jesus’ explanation for condoning the exorcist’s success in Mark’s account is practical, not theological. He argues that they cannot use his name to do mighty works and speak ill of him later. Anyone who recognizes the power of Jesus’ name will not accuse him of working by Beelzebub, as the teachers of the law from Jerusalem had done (3:22).

There’s more information on this passage, but we’ll stop here for now. When reading this, I was thankful for the cross-reference to Moses. I don’t think I would have put that together on my own! And this also helped me to understand why the disciples said what they did about the exorcist. But how does this relate to who God is?

BUILDING CONTEXT

Here’s how the NIV Application Commentary builds context to this passage (again, this is trimmed!):

A deep sense of lowliness understands that God can use anyone and applauds others who are successful for God, even though they may not be on our team. Jesus’ reaction implies that disciples who go along with him must get along with others. He not only opens admission to the reign of God to all and accepts any who come in his name, he sanctions anyone using the power of his name. The barrier between insider and outsider in this episode becomes nebulous. Augustine said: “Many whom God has, the Church does not have; and many whom the Church has, God does not have.”

CONTEMPORARY SIGNIFICANCE

Now, here comes the punch to the heart. How are we, today, making the same mistakes as the disciples? In what ways are we, too, separating and putting ourselves over our brothers and sisters in Christ?

Jesus has consistently avoided self-acclamation, but his disciples are all too ready to exalt themselves over others. If Jesus directed the same question to contemporary followers that he asked his first disciples, “What were you arguing about on the road?” the answer will be no less embarrassing. Christians still jockey for prominence. The unbridled will to power still surfaces in local churches and in denominational politics, destroying fellowship and eviscerating Christian love.

Little has changed. Seminary students who begin their studies with high ideals frequently grow disillusioned by the political gamesmanship that infests churches and denominations. Some ministers become so disillusioned by such machinations that they leave the ministry; others quickly learn to play the game; still others correctly recognize that Jesus does not reject ambition, but they sublimate it by aspiring to become the greatest servant in the church rather than the greatest overlord.

LEARN MORE

The information I pulled from the NIV Application Commentary is only covering two verses of Scripture and I had to trim it down! This is truly an in-depth resource that will also help you apply the Bible to your personal life. If you’re wanting to improve your Bible study, or struggling to make Scripture applicable in your teaching, this is definitely a commentary set worth looking into.

Currently, the NIV Application Commentary is on sale, and you can learn more about it here.

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The John Phillips Commentary Series

Posted by on 10/07/2017 in: ,

1) WHO WAS JOHN PHILLIPS?

Phillips was born in South Wales on February 11, 1927. He didn’t stay put there, however. He served in the British Army in Palestine, then moved to Canada, married the love of his life, and then found himself in the United States. For years he worked at Moody Bible Institute, serving as the Assistant Director of their Evening Extension School. Additionally, he directed the Emmaus Correspondence School, which was, at the time, the largest school of its kind in the world.

With this Doctor of Ministry, Phillips not only taught and organized academic study of God’s Word, but he wrote more than 50 books about the Bible, including complete sets of New Testament Commentaries, the Exploring the Bible Series and his Introducing People of the Bible Series

This man was a dedicated, hard worker who strived to teach others about God and His Word.

2) WHAT IS HIS COMMENTARY LIKE?

Currently, Olive Tree offers Phillips commentary collection that contains 27 volumes: 19 New Testament volumes and 8 Old Testament volumes. You can see the entire list by visiting our website.

Phillips uses the KJV translation of the Bible for all of his work, and speaks from an evangelical framework. He provides many illustrations and quotes, often applying the Bible to everyday life.

But what’s the best part of this resource?

The OUTLINES! Phillips made sure to make extensive outlines before he wrote content for his commentary. Here’s an example:

Not only does he break down large pieces of Scripture into shorter, easier-to-understand sections, but he works out of this structure through the entire commentary set. You’ll find Phillips thoughts and comments recorded in conversational sentences that make you feel as if you’re studying the Bible alongside him.

LEARN MORE

Wondering how commentaries work in the app, what books of the Bible are included in this set, or just want more information? Visit the the John Phillips Commentary Set’s product page for all that and more.

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A Little Research on the Hermeneia Commentary Series

Posted by on 09/27/2017 in: ,

Hermeneia is a Greek word, referring to a detailed, systematic exposition of scriptural work—a word entirely fitting for the title of a commentary series.

But what makes the Hermeneia Commentary Series different than any other commentary series? It might be difficult to discern. A quick search for the resource on the internet reveals a publisher-created description that might leave you with more questions than answers.

So, what’s the first step in deciding whether a commentary may be right for you? Check out the authors.

WHO WROTE HERMENEIA

This series has two main editors, one over-seeing the Old Testament contributions and the other over-seeing the New Testament.

Peter Machinist – Head of the Old Testament Editorial Board

Peter completed his undergraduate program at Harvard and then went to Yale, where he finished an MPhil and PhD. He then taught at several universities—Arizona, Michigan, and Munich to name a few. Then, in 1991, he returned to Harvard to teach in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, the Committee on the Study of Religions, and the Harvard Divinity School.

He recently retired at the beginning of 2017, and is now the Hancock Research Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages. However, he continues to be vastly interested in the cultural, intellectual, and social history of the ancient Near East—the primary reason he led the Old Testament Editorial Board for the Hermeneia Commentary.

Helmut Koester – Head of the New Testament Editorial Board

Helmut was a German-born, American scholar who sadly passed away at the beginning of 2016. He received several large degrees from the University of Marburg, University of Geneva, and Humboldt University of Berlin. Additionally, he was an ordained minister of the Lutheran Church.

Helmut spent his life fascinated by New Testament interpretation, the history of early Christianity, and archaeology. This led him to his final career as the John H. Morison Research Professor of Divinity and Winn Research Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Harvard.

WHY READ HERMENEIA

Based on the bios of the two authors, it’s evident that these men are fascinated with history. This commentary series isn’t going to be application-heavy or relying on tradition. Instead, these men most likely come to the Biblical text like an ancient artifact that needs de-coding. That’s why, in the publisher’s description, there is this caveat:

“The editors of Hermeneia impose no systematic-theological perspective upon the series (directly, or indirectly by selection of authors). Its authors lay bare the ancient meaning of a biblical work or pericope.”

Instead of coming to the text with tradition and theology in mind, Hermeneia looks to the historical context first, and rather strictly. Additionally, the scholars invited to write for this publication come from a variety of cultural and theological backgrounds. That’s a very purposeful decision. Hermenia doesn’t want to portray a certain theological or cultural bent.

This is typical of a more liberal and post-modern approach to hermeneutics, fitting for these authors because Harvard Divinity School holds to a more liberal school of thought.

LEARN MORE

If you’d like to learn more about the individuals who put together this commentary, head on over to their publisher’s website. That’s how I gathered research for this blog! You can really Google anyone these days.

Then, if you’re interested in seeing all the Hermeneia commentaries that we offer, check out this page of our website.

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10 Books to Start Your Bible Education

Posted by on 08/18/2017 in: ,

1) The Moody Bible Commentary

This single-volume commentary is perfect for the beginner Bible student. It is exclusively composed by faculty at Moody Bible Institute, which has been rigorously teaching God’s Word since 1886. Walk through the entire Bible with insights from well-respected professors, learning the historical basics of each book while referencing helpful charts and biographies. The Moody Bible Commentary will help you better understand and apply God’s written revelation to all of life!

2) Nelson’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary

As you dig deeper into God’s Word, you may not know the definitions of some of the trickier terminology. That’s why Bible Dictionaries are helpful! Select words straight from your Bible text, and Nelson’s provides helpful definitions, facts, and maps to help further your understanding. Also, Nelson’s comes with a Visual Survey of the Bible, providing easy-to-understand depictions of historical events.

3) NIV Word Study Bible with G/K and Strong’s Numbers

Word Study Bibles give a complete index of a word, listing everywhere it can be found in the Bible. This is helpful when wanting to understand a word or topic in a more holistic way. What makes our version of this Bible unique is that it is packaged with a Strong’s concordance, also providing you with the Greek or Hebrew word and its definition. Prefer a different translation? We have multiple versions of our Strong’s Tagged Bibles!

4) God is Love

What’s the difference between a commentary and a systematic theology? While a commentary goes verse-by-verse, systematic theologies trace and define who God is and who we are throughout the Bible. Bray’s book is great for a beginner because of its conversational nature and structure. Instead of tackling massive theological quandaries, Bray finds different ways to incorporate theological distinctions inside one important topic: God’s love. Nervous about studying theology? Check out #8 in this list!

5) Greg Laurie 15 Volume Collection

Greg Laurie is the senior pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, CA. At age 19 he began his ministry by leading a Bible study of 30 people. Now, Harvest is one of the largest churches in America. This collection contains 15 of Laurie’s books, including Married. Happily., Dealing with Giants, Following Jesus in a Modern World, and more. Biblical education isn’t just about academics, but also about spiritual growth and learning to apply God’s Word to your life.

6) Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion, Vol I & II

John Calvin was an influential French theologian, pastor and reformer during the Protestant Reformation. In the Biblical-academic world, everyone knows his name. Although reading his Institutes is a challenge, they are some of the most significant Christian theological texts in history. This specific translation preserves the rugged strength and vividness of Calvin’s writing, but also conforms to modern English and renders heavy theological terms in simple language.

7) Apologetics for the Twenty-first Century

Apologetics–making a defense for the faith. Louis Markos walks through the history of Apologetics, following figures such as C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton, Francis Schaeffer, Josh McDowell and more. Then he teaches you how to think logically, making your own arguments for the existence of God, the historical Jesus, and confronting post-modernism.

8) A Little Book for New Theologians: Why and How to Study Theology

Theology happens whenever we read, think, hear or say anything about God. This short books gives an introduction to the relevance of theology and the skills, attitudes and spiritual practices needed by those who take up the discipline. As you begin to pursue a Biblical education, lay the ground work properly. This book by Kelly Kapic is definitely a great start.

9) Visual Theology

This book is incredibly unique. With beautiful illustrations and flowcharts, you can learn theology easily from your device—but only with the Olive Tree Bible App. We are the only company offering this title in a digital format! For the budding theologian, this is a very helpful tool in wrapping your mind around the complexities of theology. Visit our webpage listing of this product for a chance to look inside!

10) Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith

Not only is this book incredibly informative, it is an enjoyable read. Reeves gives understanding to the most important characteristic of our God: His triune nature. This concept is incredibly difficult (and rather impossible, actually) to wrap our minds around. Yet, it is the crux of what separates our God from other gods–it is what makes salvation possible.

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5 Books for Spiritual Growth

Posted by on 08/07/2017 in: ,

SPIRITUAL GROWTH BUNDLE (27 VOLS.)

Our Spiritual Growth Bundle includes four Bible translations, five devotionals, and an array of books on spiritual growth. A few of those titles are The Power of Prayer, An Appeal to All That Doubt, and Holy in Christ. This is being discounted an incredible 81% for our Back to School sale, so we HAD to highlight it. All the titles included in this set are listed on our website, so follow the link above to learn more. ORIGINALLY: $102.74 | NOW: $19.99

GREG LAURIE COLLECTION (15 VOLS.)

Greg Laurie is the senior pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, CA. At age 19 he began his ministry by leading a Bible study of 30 people. Now, Harvest is one of the largest churches in America. This collection contains 15 of Laurie’s books, including Married. Happily., Dealing with Giants, Following Jesus in a Modern World, and more. Biblical education isn’t just about academics, but also about spiritual growth and learning to apply God’s Word to your life. ORIGINALLY: $149.85 | NOW: $14.99

PRAYING GOD’S WORD DAY BY DAY

Praying God’s Word is powerful. When you do this, you always know that you are praying His will because it’s His promises! Beth Moore put together this day-by-day format of her best-selling book, Praying God’s Word. Learn to seek the mind of Christ through daily, fervent prayer directly from Scripture. The best part about this book is that there are devotions for one-full year!
ORIGINALLY: $8.99 | NOW: $2.99


A LONG OBEDIENCE IN THE SAME
DIRECTION: DISCIPLESHIP IN AN
INSTANT SOCIETY

As a society, we are no less obsessed with the immediate than when Eugene Peterson first wrote this Christian classic. If anything, social media and the Internet may have intensified our quest for the quick fix. Peterson finds encouragement for modern pilgrims as we learn to grow in worship, service, and joy. This 20th anniversary edition of A Long Obedience in the Same Direction features these Psalms in Peterson’s widely acclaimed paraphrase, The Message. ORIGINALLY: $16.99 | NOW: $9.99

THE DEVOTIONAL BIBLE NOTES: EXPERIENCING THE HEART OF JESUS

Read the Bible and be encouraged by famous author Max Lucado. This study Bible brings together words of encouragement and gentle wisdom, all accessible with just a tap within our Bible app. The Devotional Bible is the perfect refuge for anyone that needs truth and encouragement to hold on to. By following the link above you will also be able to watch a video explaining how this resource works inside our app.
ORIGINALLY: $39.99 | NOW: $14.99



Want to see more deals? Check out our Back to School Sale! Know of any other great books on spiritual growth that should be on this list? Share in a comment below!

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Link Biblical Themes—Thompson Chain Reference Study Bible

Posted by on 07/05/2017 in: ,

Commentaries and study notes are great tools for understanding what the Bible has to say to us today. However, sometimes we forget that scripture itself can help us understand other parts of scripture. God’s inspired Word is a complex tapestry of themes all woven together, and the development of those themes can provide us with insight into the relevant message of the Bible.

Finding the pattern in this tapestry isn’t an easy task, though. I like to use the Thompson Chain Reference Study Bible, which links various themes together as they are touched upon and developed throughout Scripture. It quickly reveals thousands of thematic chains within my Olive Tree Bible App at the touch of my finger. Not only that, but this resource also contains a great study Bible, offering cross references, book outlines, book introductions, maps, and more.

Instead of simply telling you, I’ll show you how easy this tool is to use in five easy steps on my iPad.

1. PICK A PASSAGE

Pull up 1 Samuel chapter 17 up in your Bible, or any other passage you want to study. Your screen may look a bit different than ours depending on what device you’re using and the number of resources you have.

2. OPEN THE RESOURCE

Tap “Thompson Chain Reference” from the resource guide. Your split-window view will change to a list of verses directly related to your location in the Bible.

3. CHOOSE A VERSE

Select the verse you want by tapping on it in the split window. In this example we’ll choose 17:4.

4. PICK A THEME

You can now choose the theme you want to explore in the list under the verse. For example, choosing “1409 Giants” results in the following:

5. READ!

Now it’s as easy as tapping on each verse reference to get a pop-up window. There you can read verses that touch on the same topic. Now you’ve just learned more about giants in the Bible!

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Do You Know about These Two Unique Features of John’s Gospel?

Posted by on 06/16/2017 in:

It has been understood that John’s Gospel is a distinct chronicling of the person and work of Jesus of Nazareth. It’s so unique that biblical scholars have isolated it from the so-called Synoptic gospels. And if you’ve spent any amount of time with the beloved disciple’s gospel you’ve probably sensed its uniqueness, too.

But do you know some of the central features that make it distinct? Edward W. Klink III helpfully explains two such characteristics in his new John commentary (ZECNT), which is currently 50% off on our website.

Building on the pioneering work of C. H. Dodd, who “In the twentieth century … provided the most focused analysis” (53), Klink provides readers an extended introduction to two unique features of John in order to help readers interpret it rightly: dialogues and monologues.

Johannine Dialogues: Functions and Forms

Klink identifies two functions for the dialogues in John’s gospel. First, they serve an important role in developing its broader narrative, where the meaning lies not only in what is said, but in how what’s said moves the plot forward.

The dialogue brings meaning to Jesus’s person and work so that the characters—and therefore the readers—are exhorted to take a particular action, thereby moving the plot along toward it ultimate goal: “that you may believe” (20:31). (54)

Second, the dialogues give meaning and direction to the pericope where they occur. This narrative device serves to offer the necessary material to interpret the more narrow elements of the scenes themselves, as well as move the broader plot forward.

Such insights into the function of a dialogue provide lenses with which to understand the passage’s details and developing movement. Only by understanding the dialogical structure of the scene can the reader make sense of not only its details but also the rhetorical meaning of the interaction. (54)

Johannine dialogues come in three forms: social challenge, taking the form of an informal debate where the honor and authority of the interlocutor is challenged; legal challenge, in which a principle, idea, or point of law is formally debated; and rhetorical challenge, where conflict between two parties is intensified by reestablishing antithetical positions, rather than necessarily advancing an argument.

Klink suggests primarily seven formal dialogues in John’s gospel between Jesus and other characters, utilizing these three forms:

  1. Nicodemus (3:1–21) social
  2. Samaritan Woman (4:1–42) rhetorical
  3. Jewish Crowd (6:22–71) social
  4. Jewish Authorities and Jewish Crowd (7:14–52) social
  5. Jewish Authorities (8:12–59) legal
  6. Jewish Authorities (9:1–41) legal
  7. Jewish Crowd (10:22–42) social

Like Dodd, he makes clear John used dialogues deliberately in his narrative composition:

Using the conventions and patterns of ancient dialogue, the Gospel’s dialogues offer a dramatic theological presentation that engages the reader at numerous levels, drawing them more fully into the depth of the Gospel story that began in the conflict between darkness and the light (1:5) and ends in the cross. (57)

Johannine Monologues: Functions and Forms

Also unique in John’s Gospel is the use of several extended discourses, or monologues, of Jesus. Klink explains, “a monologue is similar to a dialogue in that it is set in the context of an engagement and conflict, but rather than engaging point for point it allows for a lengthy argument.” (57)

Like dialogues, Jesus’s monologues contain similar elements of rhetoric, challenge, and conflict. They also function similarly: “its significance is not merely the meaning of the language and the propositions of the argument but also what the language does” (57), especially how it is connected to the narrative elements before and afterward.

Klink explains that monologues will contain within the narrative flow dialogue and audience engagement. Yet attention isn’t meant to be on the conflict and resolution inherent within such scenes. Instead, “The monologue brings meaning to Jesus’s person and work so that the listeners—and therefore the readers—are exhorted to take a particular action.” (58)

He identifies four substantial monologues in John’s Gospel:

  1. The Identity of (the Son of) God (5:19–47)
  2. The Shepherd and the Sheep (10:1–21)
  3. “The Hour has Come” (12:20–50)
  4. The Farewell Discourse (13:31–16:33)

“As a whole, the monologues provide robust insight into the identity of Jesus and the work given to him from the Father,” concludes Klink. “The monologues also serve the narratives by facilitating the Gospel’s plot, depicting in great detail God’s own argument and explication of his person and work in the world.” (58)

***

Leveraging the important interpretive insights of these two narrative features, Klink helps readers of the Fourth Gospel exegete it with care and precision in order to offer its theological and homiletical insights to those they shepherd.

Interested in learning more about the uniqueness of John’s Gospel? Don’t miss out on purchasing this commentary at half it’s normal price, available on our website.

This blog was written in coordination with Zondervan Academic.

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Last chance: Sale on Expositor’s Bible Commentary – Revised Edition

Posted by on 06/14/2017 in: ,

Expositor's Bible Commentary - Revised Edition

Right now, the 13-volume Expositor’s Bible CommentaryRevised Edition is over $200 off at Olive Tree.

This commentary set is a favorite of pastors, teachers, and Bible students for its scholarly but accessible approach to helping you understand the biblical text’s core meaning. It’s full of world-class scholarship from D. A. Carson, George Guthrie, John Walton, Andreas Kostenberger, and many others.

“If there is one set of commentaries that all pastors and teachers should have, this is it,” writes Daniel I. Block.

Get the complete collection on sale now at Olive Tree.

Don’t wait! The deal will disappear soon.

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These Exegetical Commentaries Are for You, If…

Posted by on 06/12/2017 in: ,

Right now the Zondervan Exegetical Commentaries on the New Testament and Old Testament are steeply discounted (50% off).

If you identify with one or more of these statements, this commentary series is for you:

  1. you would like help interpreting the words of Scripture without getting bogged down in scholarly issues that seem irrelevant to the life of the church.
  2. you would like to see a visual representation (a graphical display) of the flow of thought in each passage.
  3. you would like expert guidance from solid evangelical scholars who set out to explain the meaning of the original text in the clearest way possible and to help you navigate through the main interpretive issues.
  4. you have taken Greek and would like a commentary that helps you apply what you have learned without assuming you are a well-trained scholar.
  5. you would find it useful to see a concise, one- or two- sentence statement of what the commentator thinks the main point of each passage is.
  6. you want to benefit from the results of the latest and best scholarly studies and historical information that helps to illuminate the meaning of the text.
  7. you would find it useful to see a brief summary of the key theological insights that can be gleaned from each passage and some discussion of the relevance of these for Christians today.

View the deals now.

Don’t wait, because this sale ends June 26, 2017!

P.S. Daniel I. Block explains the series’ approach in this video:

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How does the Expositor’s Bible Commentary Approach Scripture?

Posted by on 06/07/2017 in: ,

Expositor's Bible Commentary

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary series set the gold standard for expositors—for understanding the biblical authors and teaching their message today.

Save 50% on this 12-volume commentary set right now. Don’t wait.

ABOUT THE EXPOSITOR’S BIBLE COMMENTARY

The Gold Medallion Award–winning Expositor’s Bible Commentary offers pastors, teachers and students a comprehensive tool for the exposition of the Scriptures and the teaching and proclamation of their message.

How does this commentary approach Scripture?

Hear from the General Editor, the late Frank E. Gaebelein:

The chief principle of interpretation followed in this commentary is the grammatico-historical onenamely, that the primary aim of the exegete is to make clear the meaning of the text at the time and in the circumstances of its writing.

This endeavor to understand what in the first instance the inspired writers actually said must not be confused with an inflexible literalism. Scripture makes lavish use of symbols and figures of speech; great portions of it are poetical. Yet when it speaks in this way, it speaks no less truly than it does in its historical and doctrinal portions.

To understand [Scripture’s] message requires attention to matters of grammar and syntax, word meanings, idioms, and literary formsall in relation to the historical and cultural setting of the text.

About the contributors:

  • 78 international contributors from the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, Australia, and New Zealand are included
  • Many evangelical denominations are represented including Anglican, Baptist, Brethren, Methodist, Nazarene, Presbyterian, and Reformed
  • Contributors include Walter C. Kaiser Jr., Leon Morris, D. A. Carson, general editor Frank E. Gaebelein, and many others

The contributors represent the best in evangelical scholarship committed to the divine inspiration, complete trustworthiness, and full authority of the Bible.

Learn more and see the sale today.

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