Product Reviews

These articles tell you about the many fine products available from Olive Tree.

The Bible Study App Video Review

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Thanks to user K. Owen for his great review of Olive Tree Bible Software’s Bible Study App!

What’s in the Archaeological Study Bible?

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When I first heard about the Archaeological Study Bible, I wasn’t sure what to think.  My initial thought was how could there be an entire Bible devoted to archaeological study?  And honestly, how could a study Bible devoted to archaeological study not be a snoozer?  So, I got a copy of the Archaeological Study Bible and began looking through it.  Wow, was I impressed (and wrong)!

The Archaeological Study Bible is a great resource.  There are 520 articles covering five main categories: Archaeological Sites, Cultural and Historical Notes, Ancient Peoples and Lands, the Reliability of the Bible, and Ancient Texts and Artifacts.  The Bible Study App enriches the Archaeological Study Bible. As you read through your Bible, the split screen and resource guide keep you synced with your reading.

Here’s an example of an article on the Zealots and Essenes (screenshots from an iPad, click images to enlarge):

Also included are almost 500 full-color photographs throughout the text.  Here’s two examples:

Throughout the text there are detailed charts like this one:

At the end of the Archaeological Study Bible there are several maps that help you get an idea of the placement of biblical events:

The authors of the Archaeological Study Bible also included detailed book introductions for every book of the Bible. Other study tools include a glossary, extensive concordance and several indexes to help you find articles relevant to your study.

The Bible Study App enhances this resource when articles reference other articles within the Archaeological Study Bible.  By tapping or clicking on the hyperlink, you can go directly to the related article, view in the Split Window, or view it in a Popup screen.

As you can see, you can spend hours learning the historical background of the Bible and the settings in which biblical events took place.  The articles and pictures will give you insights into the Bible and make you feel like you could have been there.

You can get the Archaeological Study Bible for 50% off this week only. Click here for more!

Using the NA28 in the Bible Study App

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By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

A Little BackgroundNA 28 Before I came to Olive Tree, I worked at a private high school teaching Greek and Latin.  A couple of the Greek classes that I taught were on New Testament Greek, and toward the end of the first year we would begin reading from the New Testament.  The first time I taught this class I was torn about buying a class set of Greek New Testaments.  I really wanted to use the NA-27 in class since it was the standard (at the time).  I looked at a couple of less expensive alternatives, but ended up spending the extra money to buy the NA-27.  It was the standard scholarly text of the Greek New Testament after all, and I felt that my students should be familiar with it.  In addition, there were a number of features that I really liked about the NA-27 that I wanted them to have access to, such as the cross-references, the critical apparatus, and the Eusebian tables.  Imagine my dismay when my students almost universally found my beloved NA-27 “confusing”.  In later classes, I improved upon this experience by giving a special lecture introducing the NA-27 before we started our first reading from it.

The NA-28 has now replaced the NA-27 as the standard scholarly Greek text and many features of The Bible Study App make it easier to use, but using certain features of the text and the apparatus can still be confusing.  With that in mind, I’d like to explain how to do a few basic things with the NA-28 text with Critical Apparatus and Mounce parsings, available through the Bible Study App.  We also offer the NA28 with critical apparatus (but no parsings), and the NA28 with parsings (but no apparatus).  If you have one of these texts, you may still find this article helpful, but not all of the information will apply to the particular text that you have.

Using the Parsings
Accessing a parsing in the Bible Study App is as simple as tapping on a word.  A popup should then appear displaying the dictionary form of the word, followed by a link to a Greek-English dictionary, followed by a gloss, then the parsing information.  The parsing information is stored in the form of a code which is written out fully immediately below.android-morph

One feature that many users are not aware of is that the Bible Study App supports searching for specific forms of words by using these codes.  To do so, first check the “options” when you initiate a search.  You will need to have a parsed text open, and you will also need to switch the “search options” to “Search on Morphology.  Next, type in the dictionary form of the word, followed by the @ symbol, followed by the appropriate parsing code.  For example, searching for ἀγάπη@NNFS would return all occurrences of the noun ἀγάπη in the nominative singular.

At the bottom of the pop-up window, there is also a “lookup” button.  This queries other dictionaries in your library to find out if they have any articles about that word.  If they do, they will show up in the results.  Tapping on one will open that article in the popup window.  Often at this point, I will tap on the “tear out” button and choose to open the dictionary in the split window in order to read it more easily.  When I’m done, I simply tap the slider bar, which closes the split window.  The resource is still open there if I want to access it again, but it is out of view while I continue my reading.  If I want to open an article on another word, I repeat the process that I just outlined rather than opening the dictionary and trying to navigate to the entry I want.

Using the Critical Apparatus
There are two ways to access the critical apparatus in the Bible Study App.  The first is to tap on one of the text-critical symbols in the Greek text.  This will open the apparatus in a popup window to the corresponding location.  If you wish to keep the apparatus open in the split window, tap on the “tear-out” icon and select “open in split window”.android-criticalapp

I have pretty large fingers and find that I only hit the symbol about half the time.  When working with a parsed text, this can be obnoxious since I generally end up hitting the word and getting the parsing info rather than the apparatus.  In order to facilitate more easily opening the apparatus, we have included it as a separate item in your library.  This means that you can also get to it by opening the split window, clicking on the library button, and choosing the NA-28 Critical Apparatus from your library.

The critical apparatus has been “versified” which means that it will follow the main window (as long as your settings are set up this way).  It also means that when you tap on the “navigate” button that you will see the familiar verse chooser rather than a table of contents.  If the apparatus is left open in the split window with the Greek text in the main window, it will follow along as you read through a passage, providing an effect similar to reading from the print edition.

Probably the greatest obstacle to using the critical apparatus is becoming familiar with all of the symbols that it uses.  Unfortunately, we do not have these all tagged at this point, which means that there is no simple way to access the meanings.  However, we do include the introduction to the NA-28, which includes the definitions.  These are listed under “III. THE CRITICAL APPARATUS” in the introduction.  A simple hack which makes it much easier to jump to this section is to add a bookmark at this location.  It will then show up under the “My Stuff” menu in your bookmarks.  While this is not an ideal solution, it does help a lot when trying to look up symbols or abbreviations.  In fact, you could bookmark the sub-sections as well to make it even easier to get to exactly where you want each time.

Wrapping Things Up
I’ve dealt a lot with the mechanics of using the NA28 with the Bible Study App in this article, but I haven’t touched on what is probably the most difficult thing for those who are unfamiliar with the NA28: actually using the information that it provides to help prepare a Bible study.  As I’m sure you are aware, this is a complicated topic, and for that reason I’m going to address it in a later, separate blog post.

 

The NA28 and related products are on sale this week only! Get it HERE!

 

 

Video Review Honorable Mention

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If The Bible Study App were a movie this would be the trailer! Thanks to Bob B. for his submission.

 



The Voice Bible in The Bible Study App

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The Voice Bible is a faithful dynamic equivalent translation that reads like a story with all the truth and wisdom of God’s Word. Through a collaboration of more than 120 biblical scholars, pastors, writers, musicians, poets, and artists, The Voice recaptures the passion, grit, humor, and beauty that is often lost in the translation process. The result is a retelling of the story of the Bible in a form as fluid as modern literary works, yet remaining painstakingly true to the original manuscripts.

Features include:

Information added to help contemporary readers understand what the original readers would have known intuitively

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Commentary notes include cultural, historical, theological, or devotional thoughts

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Screenplay format, ideal for public readings and group studies

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Book introductions

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Here’s a video from publisher Thomas Nelson to give an example of The Voice in Luke 11:

Now through July 22 you can get The Voice Bible for 40% off the regular price.

Honorable Mention

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We received so many great video reviews for our recent contest we thought we’d show some of them. Here’s an honorable mention that is sure to inspire!

 


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