Look Inside: Case for Christ Study Bible

Posted by on 03/21/2014 in: ,

Based on the NIV translation, The Case for Christ Study Bible Notes is an engaging, informative resource that motivates seekers, skeptics, and long-time Christians to investigate for themselves the Bible’s most compelling claims: the existence of a compassionate God and the promise of eternal life through His Son, Jesus.

Watch the video below to see how this title looks in The Bible Study App.

 
Get the Case for Christ Study Bible Notes here!

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Free Resource Friday

Posted by on 03/21/2014 in:

how people changeToday you can get the book How People Change by Paul Tripp and Timothy Lane for free to read in The Bible Study App!

What does it take for lasting change to take root in your life? If you’ve ever tried, failed, and wondered why, you need How People Change. This book explains the biblical pattern for change in a clear, practical way you can apply to the challenges of daily life. But change involves more than a biblical formula: you will see how God is at work to make you the person you were created to be. That powerful, loving, redemptive relationship is at the heart of all positive change you experience.

Find this book in the in-app store of The Bible Study App or go here for download instructions.

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What is Apologetics?

Posted by on 03/18/2014 in: ,

Apologetics gives us a rational, reasoned defense of the Christian faith. While apologetics can’t prove anything (which is true of all systems of belief, such as humanism, atheism, and other religions), it does show us that we don’t have to put our brain on the shelf when we become followers of Jesus.

Watch the video below to hear Dr. Bill Mounce as he explains what Apologetics can and can’t do.

Want to learn more?

Check out this week’s specials on Apologetics and Church History resources.

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Look Inside: The Apologetics Study Bible

Posted by on 03/17/2014 in: ,

The Apologetics Study Bible helps you grasp the depth of biblical insight on a variety of issues and it also reveals flaws in today’s bizarre worldviews.

With more than 100 articles relate biblical truth to science, history, archaeology, psychology, philosophy, and other critical subjects the Apologetics Study Bible is an invaluable tool.

Watch the video below to see how this great resource works in The Bible Study App.

The Apologetics Study Bible is on sale this week.

Get it here!

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Free Resource Friday

Posted by on 03/14/2014 in:

This week’s Free Resource Friday is the book Delirious by Martin Smith. Delirious

For seventeen years, Martin Smith held the microphone for Delirious? — the mega-selling, Dove Award–winning, Grammy-nominated band that helped bring the modern worship movement into existence. Martin sang before popes and princes, cheered a generation of history-makers into action, and saw his life change in ways he could never have imagined. Yet Martin still wrestled with questions every Christian faces: How do I balance my ministry with my family? How do I know what God is leading me to do? Can I hold on to my first love for God while still holding on to the wisdom gained over years?Martin reflects on everything from the craft of leading worship to the challenges of parenthood to how to find a place of compassion in our postmodern culture. Along the way, he challenges us to ask: Are we going to be spectators—or agents of change? Are we going to read history—or make it happen? Always personal and often surprising, Martin’s story will spur you to embrace the action God wants you to take.

Look for this title as a free download in the in-app store of The Bible Study App!

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The Happiest Place on Earth

Posted by on 03/12/2014 in:

I don’t travel to new places very often; I love being at home. A couple weeks ago I broke the mold and traveled to southern California to spend time with my sister, and we spent a Saturday at Disneyland. The day was a happy whirl of rides, lines, ice cream, and warm sunshine, but around 3:30 that afternoon, when the park was at its most busy and we couldn’t walk without bumping into someone, I began to feel the effects of the crowds. As a child, I might have pitched a fit. But as such tantrums are not tolerated with adults (however much we might want to), I agreed with my sister that a half hour break in the car would be good for both of us. I recognized unmistakable symptoms of being overtired, irritable, and, in this new environment with so many unknown faces, a little fragile, too.

The next day, my sister and I visited my grandma who had recently suffered a minor stroke. My sister and I helped her from her wheelchair to the hospital bed, and she lay there helplessly, unable to use her arms to prop herself up on the bed. My sister and the nurse hoisted her up, and we stood over her, looking down.  She grabbed our hands, hers still surprisingly firm and strong, and said to us, “I’m sorry you have to see me at my worst.” I smiled at her and squeezed her hand, but my insides wrinkled uncomfortably as I recalled the day before, overwhelmed in the happiest place on earth, ready to burst into tears like a petulant child. My grandma’s worst didn’t seem that much different than my worst.

Two weeks later, I sat in the Ash Wednesday service at church and listened to the words of invitation to the observance of Lent:Wooden cross isolated on white

“Friends in Christ, every year at the time of the Christian Passover, we celebrate our redemption through the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. Lent is a time to prepare for this celebration and to renew our life in the paschal mystery. We begin our journey to Easter with the sign of ashes. This ancient sign speaks of the frailty and uncertainty of human life and marks the penitence of this community.”

As the sign of the cross was marked on my forehead with ashes, I was struck by the troubling paradox in the words of invitation, new life and frailty in the same breath. It’s like Lent itself, a season marked by penitence and fasting, which is puzzlingly placed at the time of year when the created world is bursting into new life. The grass becomes green again, the trees straighten towards the light, and flowers emerge from the cold ground.

I realized as I felt the ash on my forehead that my grandma and I both represented the paradox of Lent. My grandma, whose earthly body is failing, is headed for the new life that awaits us in heaven, where the earthly wear and tear fades away forever. While still young and healthy, I have my own frailty in wrestling with the sin and brokenness that are inherent to human life. And yet, the promise of new life still extends to me in the culmination of Lent, that glorious triumph of the cross of Christ. I like Disneyland and all, but surely living in the light of new life, even with the shadow of death, is the happiest place on earth.

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