Posts tagged Bible

Palm Sunday

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This Sunday commemorates Jesus triumphal entry into Jerusalem and is called Palm or Passion Sunday, depending on your tradition. All four gospels record this significant and prophetic event and I highly recommend you read them for yourself. You can find them in Matthew 21:1-11; Mark 11:1-11; Luke 19:28-44; and John 12:12-19. As I reread each account myself here are four things that stick out about this historic event that we still commemorate today.

Jesus Fulfilled Prophecy.
Not only was Jesus the long awaited King that the Jews had been longing for but his very entry into Jerusalem was just how it had been prophesied over 500 years earlier.
Zechariah 9:9 says, “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.”
I can imagine that Jewish theologians had been trying to reconcile their picture of a King (think David or Solomon) with the idea that he would ride in on a little colt, his feet barely off the ground. Yet here he was, having given his disciples an awkward command on how to get the colt, fulfilling prophecy that had been written centuries earlier. This was a plot twist that I don’t think even Hollywood could dream up.

What’s with the Palms?
The imagery of palms was a part of the Jewish culture and often reflected honor and nobility. 1 Kings  chapter 6 and 7 record how Solomon had them as part of the sacred carvings of the temple. In Mark’s account of Jesus entry, people are spreading palm branches out on the ground along with their cloaks in what I imagine would be a sort of ancient red carpet that probably helped keep the dust down.

The significance of this honor paid to Jesus also foreshadows what is to come. In Revelation 7:9 there’s an incredible description of worship that – you guessed it – includes palm branches. So we see here Jesus is fulfilling the prophecy of Zechariah and also pointing forward to an even greater scene of worship that is to come.

Hosanna
The chances are pretty good that at some point you’ve sung a song at church with the word ‘Hosanna’ in it. As Jesus made his entry there was definitely some worship going on but what does Hosanna actually mean? It was a desperate cry from an oppressed people living under Roman rule that means ‘Oh save’ or ‘Save us now’.  He would certainly save them but not quite how they imagined.

Where’s the Victory?
The Jews had been waiting and their King was finally here! Sure he was riding on a baby donkey and didn’t have a sword, armor, or an army but he was there none the less. As the shouts of Hosanna went out, everyone anticipated what this long awaited Kings next move would be. How would he save them? Would he be like David and his mighty men? Would he be like Solomon with wisdom and riches? “Save us now”, they cried!

One week later, many of these same people who had shouted ‘Hosanna’ would be shouting ‘Barabbas’ . They would trade their long awaited King for a thief and a murderer. He hadn’t fulfilled their image of a King or brought about their idea of salvation and so they turned on him.

But God in his sovereign grace had a plan that included a vastly different idea of what salvation was to look like, one that we’ll be celebrating this coming week. I’ll leave you with these words from Revelation 7:9-10:
“After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, ” Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”

That’s my King!

What does Amen mean?

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There are quite a few words that you’ll only ever hear in church. For instance, you’ll often hear invitations to a ’fellowship’ activity announced on a Sunday morning, but the chances are you won’t use the word fellowship to invite your friend over for a BBQ or to watch the Super Bowl. One word that is used today, in churches all around the world, is the word Amen. Although many people use it in the right context, some may not actually know what it means. So what does the word Amen actually mean?

 

 

Amen is an ancient Hebrew word and is primarily used in three ways in the scriptures:

At the beginning of a discourse/statement/sermon. In these cases Amen would often mean (and be translated) as verily, or truly.

  • Matthew 5:18 is an example of this:
    “For truly [Amen], I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.”

In the Old Testament it’s also used as a descriptor of the character of God being true and/or faithful.

  • Deuteronomy 7:9 says, “Know therefore that the Lord your God is God, the faithful [Amen]God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, to a thousand generations.”
    See also: Isa. 49:7, 65:16.

The most common placement of Amen is at the end of a prayer, sermon, or statement - as an agreement. It could then be translated as ‘so be it’, ‘so it is’,  or ‘may it be fulfilled’. These still have the similar ideas of truth, faith, or belief in.

  •  The Bible actually ends with this affirmation in Revelation 22:20-21: “He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come Lord Jesus! The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen.”

So, while many people haven’t researched the Hebrew roots, chances are, most have always had a basic understanding of what Amen means and have been using it in the right context. Hopefully this helps give you a bit larger picture of the meaning and you can shout, ”Amen” with more authority the next time your Pastor is preaching.

If you’re interested in doing similar word studies on your own, consider buying a Bible with Strong’s or a Bible Dictionary like Vine’s that make word study as easy as a click or tap in The Bible Study App.

Right now we’re doing a special giveaway and you can get the ESV with Strong’s for free.

Go here to get it now!

 

 

 

What is a Strong’s Tagged Bible?

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The well-known Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance lists all the significant words in the Bible and references each word to the original Hebrew and Greek languages. The concordance was first published in 1890 by Dr. James Strong, whose life’s work was to provide students of the Bible with an accurate and functional tool to understand the Bible’s original languages. He and others worked on the list for 35 years!

Dr. Strong’s work is still universally recognized as one of the essential aids for studying the Bible and thanks to The Bible Study App it’s easier than ever to access for deeper study of the Bible. Here’s a brief demonstration of how it works. All screenshots are from The Bible Study App on an Android tablet.

To find out the Hebrew or Greek word behind the English translation simply tap a word on any Strong’s tagged Bible.
(Click here for a list of available Bible’s with Strong’s tagging).

Strongs1

In the above screen shot I’ve tapped the word ‘nations’ found in Matthew 28:18 and I see that the Greek word is ‘ethnos’. I can then look up that Greek word in my other library resources like a concordance or dictionary by tapping the Lookup button in the popup window.

strongs2

With a concordance I can see all of the different place that word is listed and how it is translated. In this case ‘ethnos’ is often translated as Gentiles in other places in Matthew.

strongs-dictionaryI can also look the word up in a dictionary like Vine’s or Mounce’s Expository Dictionary to see further explanation.

strongs-mounce

Lastly, if you would like to see or hide the actual Strong’s numbers associated with the words, you can turn this feature on or off by tapping Settings>Advanced Settings> Other Settings (Text Layout/Display for iOS)>Strong’s Numbers.

This is how the text would look with Strong’s numbers viewable compared with the first image in this post which hides the numbers.

Show Strong's Numbers

You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App.

Right now you can get the ESV Bible with Strong’s for free! Click HERE.
Here are the current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Who was St. Patrick really?

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He didn’t drive out snakes, drink green beer, or pinch people. In fact, he wasn’t even Irish! For the truth about St. Patrick watch the video below from our friends at Rose Publishing.

For great titles on church history and more go here!

 

Free Resource Friday

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The SBL Greek New Testament is another great Free book to add to your study library!

The SBL Greek New Testament differs from the standard text in more than 540 variation units. The existence of an alternative critically edited text will help to remind readers of the Greek New Testament that the text-critical task is not finished. Moreover, by reminding readers of the continuing need to pay attention to the variant readings preserved in the textual tradition, it may also serve to draw attention to a fuller understanding of the goal of New Testament textual criticism: both identifying the earliest text and also studying all the variant readings for the light they shed on how particular individuals and faith communities adopted, used, and sometimes altered the texts that they read, studied, and transmitted.

 

Find this title in the in-app store of the Bible Study App or go here for download instructions.

 

You can also go HERE to check out other Hebrew and Greek resources for use within The Bible Study App.

Free Resource Friday

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Today we wanted to highlight a great FREE resource from Pastor John Piper who also uses The Bible Study App from Olive Tree. Here’s what he says about The Bible Study App by Olive Tree:

“Olive Tree BibleReader is my default mobile Bible. I use it for devotions every day, usually from my iPad… The split window lets me keep a Greek and Hebrew window open as I read, and the pop-up lexicons fill in the gaps in my memory. The copy-and-paste features let me copy and paste easily to Twitter if I want to create a tweet out of something moving from my devotions.”
“Never before has the Bible been so easily accessible. Go there over and over again through the day. It is the voice of God.”
-John PiperJohn Piper Sermons

You can download and read over 1200 sermons spanning 20+ years of Pastor John Piper’s ministry find them in the store of the Bible Study App or get download directions by clicking here!

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