Posts tagged Cross References

How to Use God’s Commentary on Scripture

5

By Olive Tree Employee: David Mikucki

Olive Tree has a lot of commentaries and study Bibles available, and I love using them. I find myself using one almost every day, even if it’s only to get background information on a verse as I read each day. The Resource Guide makes it easy to do just that. I can’t even imagine trying to carry Calvin’s 22-volume commentary set or even the hefty ESV Study Bible with me everywhere.

But as I’m sure you’re aware, commentaries and study Bibles can get things wrong. Theologians and scholars make mistakes and misinterpret things, but God is perfect and doesn’t make any mistakes. Wouldn’t it be great if God had written a commentary on Scripture? Well, in a way He did, and His commentary comes free with The Bible Study App. Let me explain what I mean…

Interpreting Scripture with Scripture

frustrationIt has been said that Scripture is its own best interpreter, and that’s absolutely true. It has also been said that when we’re having trouble interpreting a text that seems unclear, the best place we can go is to clearer texts that talk about the same subject. So when Jesus speaks in a parable, it can be very helpful to see what Paul had to say about the subject. That can help to guard us from error as we seek to understand the meaning of difficult passages. In this sense, God gives us commentary on Scripture through other Scripture.

Before I used The Bible Study App, I would do this by looking at the tiny cross-references in my Bible text, then I would try to keep my finger where I started as I used my other hand to look up the cross-references—leaving a finger at each cross reference. That got pretty crazy pretty quick since I only have ten fingers. Besides that, what about keeping my place in commentaries?

Thankfully, Olive Tree offers a few features that make this a lot easier.

Cross Reference Popups

Several of the translations Olive Tree offers (like the ESV and the NIV) have cross-references built right into the Bible text. Cross-references are references to verses that the translators thought were related to the verse you’re reading. They look like little superscripted letters. When you tap them, you see popup that shows you the cross references related to that verse:

crossreferences

The list of cross-references, of course, isn’t inspired. But Scripture is inspired and the cross references are designed to take you to places in Scripture that are related to the passage you’re reading. In the example below, I was reading the story of Cain and Abel in Genesis 4, and I found a cross-reference where Hebrews gives us some extra insight into this story:

cainandabel

Two Passages Side-by-Side

If you want to dig into God’s commentary even more, you might find popups don’t show enough context and they can get in your way of reading the original passage. With split window, you can easily pull up two whole passages of Scripture side-by-side. First open split window by tapping on the arrow at the edge of your screen:

resourceguide

This will probably bring up the Resource Guide, so tap Open at the top of the Resource Guide, then tap Recently Opened and select one your preferred Bible translations:

recentlyopened

By default, the split window is set to show the same passage that you have open in the main window so that you can compare translations, but if you disable window syncing, you can use the two screens as if they’re two separate Bibles. To do this, tap the [>>] icon at the top right of the split window, then tap Sync Settings and turn off Sync Windows:

syncwindows

Now, you can open a passage that’s related to the one you’re currently reading. I’m in Jeremiah 31:31, reading about the New Covenant. Hebrews has a lot to say about this passage in chapters 8 and 10, so I’ll take my split window to Hebrews 8 by using the Go To button:

goto

Now I have both passages opened. I can read Scripture and God’s commentary on Scripture—more Scripture—right next to each other!

hebrews

Conclusion

I don’t consider my study of a passage complete until I’ve looked to see what God says about that passage elsewhere in His Word. These features make it a lot easier to do that. Another tool I often use is the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, which is a collection of cross-references that’s a bit larger than what you’ll find in a Bible translation. It’s quite useful and we’ve even written a blog post about how to use it.

The steps I showed you here were for iPad, but these things can be done on all of our platforms. You can learn about how to use split window and lots of other features for all our supported platforms on our help website.

David is a front end web developer at Olive Tree. He also writes on his personal blog, And the Rest of It.

Enhanced Cross References

0

See how The Bible Study App’s cross references enhanced for the Resource Guide will save you tons of time and effort. 

Browse Cross References and more titles Enhanced for the Resource Guide.

Cross References in The Bible Study App

0

See how The Bible Study App’s cross references enhanced for the Resource Guide will save you tons of time and effort.

Go Here to See Cross References Enhanced for the Resource Guide.

12 Days of Christmas – Day 8

5

By using The Bible Study App’s cross references enhanced for the resource guide, you’ll save tons of time and effort.  No longer will you have to leave your original text to search for a reference.  All your content will be at your fingertips!

Here’s how we’ve enhanced these resources (screenshots are from the Windows Desktop App.  Click for a larger view):

Bring up your preferred Bible translation in the main window. (I have the English Standard Version open to Titus 1:5 in this example.)  Click the split window button at the top right of the screen.

splitwindowbutton

Click and hold to adjust the split window to your desired size.  Next, click “Tools & Notes” to see the drop-down menu and choose “resource guide.”  Please note that the split window opens to the last place that you had viewed, so if you were last in the library, the screen will default back to the library.

splitwindowmenunavdropdown

If you scroll a little further down the split window, you’ll find the “Related Verses” section.  Since I have the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) downloaded to my PC, The Bible Study App has found cross references relevant to the Titus passage we are studying.

TSK_windows splitscreen

In our example, you’ll see that there are 44 related verses in the TSK from the Titus 1:5-16 passage we’re studying. By clicking on the TSK book cover, you can then view each set of cross references that correspond to each individual verse from our passage in Titus.

TSK_hits_small

You can click the reference in the TSK and view it as a popup, or even split it out into a new window without leaving your original text.  This feature alone will save you hours. Clicking the cross references for “Crete” in this example, I can see where the book of Acts references Crete.

TSK_windows splitscreen_popup

As you can see, having the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) cross references in The Bible Study App will help you broaden your biblical understanding quickly and easily.

Several great Bible Study Tools including Cross References, Concordances, and Bible Study Bundles are on special now as part of the 12 Day’s of Christmas sale.

Go here to see them!

The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) in The Bible Study App

0

The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) is the best known and most widely used collection of 500,000 Scripture references and parallel passages. By using The TSK in The Bible Study App you’ll save tons of time and effort.  No longer will you have to leave your original text to search for a reference.

Here’s how: (screenshots are from the Windows Desktop App.  Click for a larger view):

Bring up your preferred Bible translation in the main window. (I have the English Standard Version open to Titus 1:5 in this example.)  Click the split window button at the top right of the screen.

splitwindowbutton

Click and hold to adjust the split window to your desired size.  Next, click “Tools & Notes” to see the drop-down menu and choose “resource guide.”  Please note that the split window opens to the last place that you had viewed, so if you were last in the library, the screen will default back to the library.

splitwindowmenunavdropdown

If you scroll a little further down the split window, you’ll find the “Related Verses” section.  Since I have the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) downloaded to my PC, The Bible Study App has found cross references relevant to the Titus passage we are studying.

TSK_windows splitscreen

In our example, you’ll see that there are 44 related verses in the TSK from the Titus 1:5-16 passage we’re studying. By clicking on the TSK book cover, you can then view each set of cross references that correspond to each individual verse from our passage in Titus.

TSK_hits_small

You can click the reference in the TSK and view it as a popup, or even split it out into a new window without leaving your original text.  This feature alone will save you hours. Clicking the cross references for “Crete” in this example, I can see where the book of Acts references Crete.

TSK_windows splitscreen_popup

As you can see, having the the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) cross references in The Bible Study App will help you broaden your biblical understanding quickly and easily.

What are some ways that you’ve utilized the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (TSK) to deepen your Bible Study?

Go to Top