Posts tagged Greek

Free Resource Friday

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The SBL Greek New Testament is another great Free book to add to your study library!

The SBL Greek New Testament differs from the standard text in more than 540 variation units. The existence of an alternative critically edited text will help to remind readers of the Greek New Testament that the text-critical task is not finished. Moreover, by reminding readers of the continuing need to pay attention to the variant readings preserved in the textual tradition, it may also serve to draw attention to a fuller understanding of the goal of New Testament textual criticism: both identifying the earliest text and also studying all the variant readings for the light they shed on how particular individuals and faith communities adopted, used, and sometimes altered the texts that they read, studied, and transmitted.

 

Find this title in the in-app store of the Bible Study App or go here for download instructions.

 

You can also go HERE to check out other Hebrew and Greek resources for use within The Bible Study App.

What language was the Bible written in?

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The Bible – from Old to New Testament – was written over a span of 1500 years by forty different human authors in three different languages; Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.

 

Old Testament
With the exception of a few verses written in Aramaic the entire Old Testament was written in Hebrew. Isaiah 19:18 calls it the language of Canaan while other verses call it ‘Judean’ or the ‘language of the Jews. Ancient Hebrew dates back to before 1500 B.C.

New Testament
Many people assume that the New Testament is also written in Hebrew but by the time Jesus was born many Jews actually didn’t speak it anymore. When Rome had conquered Greece the influence of Greek culture had spread throughout the empire and so the popular language during the time the New Testament is koine (common Greek).

New Greek Bundles!
Olive Tree has new bundles available that take your Greek New Testament Bible Study to a whole new level! Our Greek bundles include powerful resources that will help you dig deeper into the original language of the New Testament. The powerful and easy to use tools of The Bible Study App allow you to quickly read, study, and grow as you dig deeper into God’s word! Click on the image below to see them and other original language resources on special this week .

GreekHebrewSale

Look Inside: NA28 Greek New Testament

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The Novum Testamentum Graece (NA28) sets a new standard among Greek New Testament editions with its revisions and improvements. In the Bible Study App by Olive Tree Bible Software the NA28 is an invaluable resource for those who want to study the original language of the New Testament.

Watch the video below to see how the NA28 works in The Bible Study app running on a Mac.

 

The NA28 is on special right now. Go here to get it!

Strong’s Tagged Bible

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A Strong’s Tagged Bible in the Bible Study App is a powerful and easy to use study tool!


You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App. Try it yourself by downloading a free demo HERE or see what Bible translations are available with Strong’s in the list below.

Here are the current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Why Learn Greek?

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Dr. Bill Mounce explains the benefits of learning Greek.

 

Interested in learning more? Grab Dr. Mounce’s book Basic’s of Biblical Greek Grammar and also check out this weeks sale on Greek and Hebrew resources.

Using the NA28 Apparatus as a Part of Bible Study

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NA28inabiblestudy

By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

I teach a weekly Bible study, and recently we were reading through the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7).  This has always been one of my favorite passages in the Scriptures and I was especially excited to get to the section on prayer and specifically to discuss the Lord’s Prayer.  I began by reading over the text of the passage itself.  I generally prepare my notes working from the Greek and Hebrew, but I then read from a number of different English translations in the study itself.  For this particular passage, I was reading from the ESV.  As soon as I had finished reading, someone pointed out that there was a line “missing” from the ESV at the end of the Lord’s Prayer.  She was using the NKJV, which adds the line “for yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever.  Amen” at the end of verse 13.  This question led to a discussion about why that line is in some translations but not others.

Since I started working for Olive Tree, I’ve transitioned to using almost entirely electronic texts of the Bible.  I had my notes and my Bibles there on my tablet, so I was able to quickly look up this addition in the NA28 critical apparatus.

The first thing that I noticed was a T-shaped symbol at the end of verse 13 in the main text.  If you consult section three in the introduction (“THE CRITICAL APPARATUS”), it is explained that this symbol means that one or more words is inserted by the manuscripts listed.  If you are unfamiliar with the apparatus, I would recommend that you simply memorize the list of symbols used.  I believe that there are only eight of them, and they indicate what is going on.  For example, a T-shaped symbol is used to indicate an addition, an O-shaped symbol is used to indicate an omission, an S-shaped symbol with a dot in it is used to indicate a transposition, and so on.  It should be kept in mind as well that “additions” and “omissions” are relative to the main text of the NA28.  An addition is material that the editors of the NA28 chose not to include in the main text, but that some manuscripts contain.  An omission is material that the editors of the NA28 included, but that some manuscripts do not contain.

Clicking on the symbol in the text will open a popup.  If you wish to open this in the split window, tap on the “tear out” icon in the top corner.  The first addition listed is simply the word αμην, which is found only in a few manuscripts.  As far as the abbreviations for manuscripts go, a Fraktur letter P followed by a superscript number is used to indicate papyri, uppercase Latin and Greek letters (and the Hebrew Alef) are used to indicate the different uncial manuscripts, and numbers are used for the miniscules.  There are also additional special abbreviations for medieval cursive manuscripts, lectionaries, the different versions (e.g. the Vulgate, the Peshitta, etc.), and citations in the Church Fathers.  These abbreviations are explained in the introduction, and more complete information about each of the manuscripts is given in Appendix I in the end matter.  The star next to 288 indicates an original reading that was subsequently corrected.   “Vg” stands for Vulgate and the abbreviation “cl” indicates that this reading is found specific in the Clementine Vulgate.  The take away here is that there is not much manuscript evidence for adding just the word αμην to the end verse 13. (more…)

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