Posts tagged hebrew

Quick Tip: Using TWOT in the Bible Study App


Let’s face it, studying the Old Testament can be hard work. This is doubly true once you dive into the original languages, and Hebrew in particular. There are a plethora of useful resources to choose from when studying Biblical Greek, such as BDAG, EDNT, TDNT, NIDNTTE, Louw & Nida, to name a few. Yet when it comes to studying Hebrew the pickings are slim. In Olive Tree, outside of the Strong’s Dictionary, you’re limited to a few titles including: NIDOTTE, HALOT, and TWOT. Even though there’s not a lot to choose from when it comes to studying Hebrew, the available resources are extremely useful.

Today I will show you how to use the Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (TWOT) in the Bible Study App.

Studying with TWOT

The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament is essentially a Hebrew lexicon and can be used like any other Hebrew lexicon. However, it has certain special features which are designed to facilitate its use, especially for those less at home in the Hebrew language. It is primarily intended to be a ready tool for the pastor and the serious student, who want to study carefully and understand more fully the sacred text.

I recommend using the TWOT in conjunction with a Strong’s Bible, such as the ESV, to get the most out of it. To illustrate how TWOT works, we will take a look at 1 Samuel 16, a passage I recently read in my Olive Tree daily reading plan. In this passage we find Samuel anointing David as the new king of Israel, since Saul, the current king, had chosen to stop obeying the Lord.

1 Samuel 16 in ESV Strong's Bible

1 Samuel 16 in ESV Strong’s Bible

With the emphasis of anointing in this passage, I wanted to find out more about the Hebrew word behind it, since I knew it is used in several contexts in Scripture. To do this, I tap on the word “anoint” in 1 Samuel 16:3 to bring up a Strong’s popup.

Strong's Popup for "Anoint"

Strong’s Popup for “Anoint”

The definition from the Strong’s dictionary is rather sparse, so I want to find out more. This is where the TWOT comes into play. I tap the “Lookup” button and then select the TWOT article.

Lookup for Hebrew Word

Lookup for Hebrew Word

TWOT in Popup Window

TWOT in Popup Window

The TWOT is now in view and I can read more about the Hebrew root word. If I want to keep the window open or have more space to read, I can then open it in the split window.

Open TWOT in Split Window

Open TWOT in Split Window

TWOT in Split Window

TWOT in Split Window

As I read I can see there is some theological significance to this word, including the divine enablement that accompanied someone being anointed king over Israel. This is information I wouldn’t have gotten from Bible reading alone or from my Study Bible notes. Thanks to TWOT I have a richer understanding of the importance of Samuel anointing David as king.

Because the TWOT is an enhanced Olive Tree product, it is extremely easy to use. Anywhere you find a tagged Hebrew word you’ll be able to quickly get to its TWOT entry. It doesn’t matter if you’re reading your Hebrew and Strong’s Bibles or looking at another Hebrew lexicon. TWOT is always right at your fingertips to expand your understanding of the Hebrew text.

Add TWOT to Your Library

The TWOT is currently half off in our Back to School sale. Add it to your Olive Tree library today and check out the other titles on sale.

What does Amen mean?


There are quite a few words that you’ll only ever hear in church. For instance, you’ll often hear invitations to a ‘fellowship’ activity announced on a Sunday morning, but the chances are you won’t use the word fellowship to invite your friend over for a BBQ or to watch the Super Bowl. One word that is used today, in churches all around the world, is the word Amen. Although many people use it in the right context, some may not actually know what it means. So what does the word Amen actually mean?



Amen is an ancient Hebrew word and is primarily used in three ways in the scriptures:

At the beginning of a discourse/statement/sermon. In these cases Amen would often mean (and be translated) as verily, or truly.

  • Matthew 5:18 is an example of this:
    “For truly [Amen], I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.”

In the Old Testament it’s also used as a descriptor of the character of God being true and/or faithful.

  • Deuteronomy 7:9 says, “Know therefore that the Lord your God is God, the faithful [Amen]God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, to a thousand generations.”
    See also: Isa. 49:7, 65:16.

The most common placement of Amen is at the end of a prayer, sermon, or statement - as an agreement. It could then be translated as ‘so be it’, ‘so it is’,  or ‘may it be fulfilled’. These still have the similar ideas of truth, faith, or belief in.

  •  The Bible actually ends with this affirmation in Revelation 22:20-21: “He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come Lord Jesus! The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen.”

So, while many people haven’t researched the Hebrew roots, chances are, most have always had a basic understanding of what Amen means and have been using it in the right context. Hopefully this helps give you a bit larger picture of the meaning and you can shout, “Amen” with more authority the next time your Pastor is preaching.

If you’re interested in doing similar word studies on your own, consider buying a Bible with Strong’s or a Bible Dictionary like Vine’s that make word study as easy as a click or tap in The Bible Study App.

Right now we’re doing a special giveaway and you can get the ESV with Strong’s for free.

Go here to get it now!




What language was the Bible written in?

The Bible – from Old to New Testament – was written over a span of 1500 years by forty different human authors in three different languages; Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.


Old Testament
With the exception of a few verses written in Aramaic the entire Old Testament was written in Hebrew. Isaiah 19:18 calls it the language of Canaan while other verses call it ‘Judean’ or the ‘language of the Jews. Ancient Hebrew dates back to before 1500 B.C.

New Testament
Many people assume that the New Testament is also written in Hebrew but by the time Jesus was born many Jews actually didn’t speak it anymore. When Rome had conquered Greece the influence of Greek culture had spread throughout the empire and so the popular language during the time the New Testament is koine (common Greek).

New Greek Bundles!
Olive Tree has new bundles available that take your Greek New Testament Bible Study to a whole new level! Our Greek bundles include powerful resources that will help you dig deeper into the original language of the New Testament. The powerful and easy to use tools of The Bible Study App allow you to quickly read, study, and grow as you dig deeper into God’s word! Click on the image below to see them and other original language resources on special this week .


Strong’s Tagged Bible


A Strong’s Tagged Bible in the Bible Study App is a powerful and easy to use study tool!

You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App. Try it yourself by downloading a free demo HERE or see what Bible translations are available with Strong’s in the list below.

Here are the current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Why Learn Greek?

Dr. Bill Mounce explains the benefits of learning Greek.


Interested in learning more? Grab Dr. Mounce’s book Basic’s of Biblical Greek Grammar and also check out this weeks sale on Greek and Hebrew resources.

Free Resource Friday


The Hebrew Bible: Westminster Leningrad Codex digital text is a project of the Groves Center based on the Leningrad Codex, Firkovich B19A, residing in the Russian National Library. The Leningrad Codex is the oldest, complete manuscript of the Hebrew Bible, dated to around 1008 AD. It serves as the basis for the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS), which has updated the Leningrad Codex text in several hundred places.

Add this title to your digital study library by clicking HERE!

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