Posts tagged how to

Using the NA28 in the Bible Study App

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By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

A Little BackgroundNA 28 Before I came to Olive Tree, I worked at a private high school teaching Greek and Latin.  A couple of the Greek classes that I taught were on New Testament Greek, and toward the end of the first year we would begin reading from the New Testament.  The first time I taught this class I was torn about buying a class set of Greek New Testaments.  I really wanted to use the NA-27 in class since it was the standard (at the time).  I looked at a couple of less expensive alternatives, but ended up spending the extra money to buy the NA-27.  It was the standard scholarly text of the Greek New Testament after all, and I felt that my students should be familiar with it.  In addition, there were a number of features that I really liked about the NA-27 that I wanted them to have access to, such as the cross-references, the critical apparatus, and the Eusebian tables.  Imagine my dismay when my students almost universally found my beloved NA-27 “confusing”.  In later classes, I improved upon this experience by giving a special lecture introducing the NA-27 before we started our first reading from it.

The NA-28 has now replaced the NA-27 as the standard scholarly Greek text and many features of The Bible Study App make it easier to use, but using certain features of the text and the apparatus can still be confusing.  With that in mind, I’d like to explain how to do a few basic things with the NA-28 text with Critical Apparatus and Mounce parsings, available through the Bible Study App.  We also offer the NA28 with critical apparatus (but no parsings), and the NA28 with parsings (but no apparatus).  If you have one of these texts, you may still find this article helpful, but not all of the information will apply to the particular text that you have.

Using the Parsings
Accessing a parsing in the Bible Study App is as simple as tapping on a word.  A popup should then appear displaying the dictionary form of the word, followed by a link to a Greek-English dictionary, followed by a gloss, then the parsing information.  The parsing information is stored in the form of a code which is written out fully immediately below.android-morph

One feature that many users are not aware of is that the Bible Study App supports searching for specific forms of words by using these codes.  To do so, first check the “options” when you initiate a search.  You will need to have a parsed text open, and you will also need to switch the “search options” to “Search on Morphology.  Next, type in the dictionary form of the word, followed by the @ symbol, followed by the appropriate parsing code.  For example, searching for ἀγάπη@NNFS would return all occurrences of the noun ἀγάπη in the nominative singular.

At the bottom of the pop-up window, there is also a “lookup” button.  This queries other dictionaries in your library to find out if they have any articles about that word.  If they do, they will show up in the results.  Tapping on one will open that article in the popup window.  Often at this point, I will tap on the “tear out” button and choose to open the dictionary in the split window in order to read it more easily.  When I’m done, I simply tap the slider bar, which closes the split window.  The resource is still open there if I want to access it again, but it is out of view while I continue my reading.  If I want to open an article on another word, I repeat the process that I just outlined rather than opening the dictionary and trying to navigate to the entry I want.

Using the Critical Apparatus
There are two ways to access the critical apparatus in the Bible Study App.  The first is to tap on one of the text-critical symbols in the Greek text.  This will open the apparatus in a popup window to the corresponding location.  If you wish to keep the apparatus open in the split window, tap on the “tear-out” icon and select “open in split window”.android-criticalapp

I have pretty large fingers and find that I only hit the symbol about half the time.  When working with a parsed text, this can be obnoxious since I generally end up hitting the word and getting the parsing info rather than the apparatus.  In order to facilitate more easily opening the apparatus, we have included it as a separate item in your library.  This means that you can also get to it by opening the split window, clicking on the library button, and choosing the NA-28 Critical Apparatus from your library.

The critical apparatus has been “versified” which means that it will follow the main window (as long as your settings are set up this way).  It also means that when you tap on the “navigate” button that you will see the familiar verse chooser rather than a table of contents.  If the apparatus is left open in the split window with the Greek text in the main window, it will follow along as you read through a passage, providing an effect similar to reading from the print edition.

Probably the greatest obstacle to using the critical apparatus is becoming familiar with all of the symbols that it uses.  Unfortunately, we do not have these all tagged at this point, which means that there is no simple way to access the meanings.  However, we do include the introduction to the NA-28, which includes the definitions.  These are listed under “III. THE CRITICAL APPARATUS” in the introduction.  A simple hack which makes it much easier to jump to this section is to add a bookmark at this location.  It will then show up under the “My Stuff” menu in your bookmarks.  While this is not an ideal solution, it does help a lot when trying to look up symbols or abbreviations.  In fact, you could bookmark the sub-sections as well to make it even easier to get to exactly where you want each time.

Wrapping Things Up
I’ve dealt a lot with the mechanics of using the NA28 with the Bible Study App in this article, but I haven’t touched on what is probably the most difficult thing for those who are unfamiliar with the NA28: actually using the information that it provides to help prepare a Bible study.  As I’m sure you are aware, this is a complicated topic, and for that reason I’m going to address it in a later, separate blog post.

 

The NA28 and related products are on sale this week only! Get it HERE!

 

 

Using a Concordance in The Bible Study App

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The Olive Tree Concordance is a great resource to use within The Bible Study App to enhance your study and we have several good ones available with the ESV, NKJV and KJV translations. Why should you use a concordance in The Bible Study App? Read below to see what a concordance can do for you.
Screenshots are taken from The Bible Study App running on Windows.

Dictionary Look up
As you read along in your Bible or other resource, you can highlight a word and select “Look Up” from the menu of options. Immediately The Bible Study App searches your library for resources related to your selected word.

Click on the Olive Tree Concordance from the list of articles to see the entry for the selected word. Similar to a traditional concordance, the Olive Tree concordance gives you a listing of all the other places in the Bible where that word is used. The Bible Study App goes beyond the traditional concordance by creating hyperlinks for all the verse references, so as you click on one, a pop up window will take you to the Bible text, making a word study quick and easy.

Strong’s Numbering
You may have noticed that there is a number listed next to each verse reference in the concordance. This is the Strong’s number for your selected word. Strong’s numbers represent the word in the original language that was translated into your English word.

For example, when you look up “mercy,” you will get a different Strong’s number for the Hebrew words raḥam and ḥânan which are both translated as mercy in English, but have different meanings in Hebrew. When you tap or click on the Strong’s number h7356, the search will bring up all of the verse references in the Bible that contain the Hebrew word raḥam.

Strong’s Dictionary
In addition to the Strong’s Numbers, you will also receive access to the Strong’s Dictionary when you purchase the Olive Tree concordances. Next to each Strong’s Number in the concordance is a hyperlink to the “Dictionary.” When you tap or click on “Dictionary” a pop up will provide the original language definition. For example, when selecting “Dictionary” for h7356 (raḥam) the entry is:
h7356. רַחַם raḥam;  from 7355; compassion (in the plural); by extension, the womb (as cherishing the fetus); by implication, a maiden: — bowels, compassion, damsel, tender love, (great, tender) mercy, pity, womb.
AV (44)- mercy 30, compassion 4, womb 4, bowels 2, pity 2, damsel 1, tender love 1; n m

The dictionary information tells me that raḥam comes from the Hebrew root word with the Strong’s number h7355. I can find the dictionary information for the root word if I click or tap on h7355. The dictionary entry also gives a definition for raḥam and lists the occurrences of the word and how it is translated. There are 44 instances of the Hebrew word in the Bible, 30 of which are translated as “mercy,” four are translated “compassion,” and so on.

As you can see, the Olive Tree Concordances are much more than a list of cross references for each word in the Bible. With dictionary information tied to the original language, these resources are valuable tools for Bible study.  Each concordance comes with a copy of the Bible in the selected translation.

Head to our online store to check out these offerings from Olive Tree!

 

Hints for Using the Word Biblical Commentary in the Bible Study App

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Using the WBC in the Bible Study App

If you saw our last article on the Word Biblical Commentary (WBC) you will know that this is a hefty commentary series. Because of the vast information included in WBC, it presents some challenges for usage in a mobile platform. Each section of commentary in WBC (covering a range of verses) is further divided into a number of sub-sections which each approach the entire set of verses from different perspectives like “Bibliography”, “Translation” and more. As I mentioned before, each of these sub-sections covers the entire range of verses for the section.  If we were to attach a Bible verse location to all of them, there would be no way to distinguish in the verse chooser between the sub-sections and you’d be given multiple results for every location.

To avoid this problem, only the translation section is tied to a Bible verse location.  This means that if you select a verse in the verse chooser, you will be taken to that verse in the translation sub-section of the appropriate section in the commentary.

Why the Resource Guide Makes WBC Even More Awesome

The best way to use WBC in the Bible Study app is with the Resource Guide.  Each of the sub-sections has been individually tagged based on content, meaning that if you have a particular Bible passage open in the main window, the Resource Guide will display the commentary notes for that passage in the WBC for each of the subsections.

Using it with the Resource Guide like this makes it easy to drill down to one sub-section, then jump back up quickly and then back down to another sub-section on the same passage.

 

More Tips for Using WBC

When using WBC in your main window, you have the option to switch the Go To menu from grid view to list view. The list view will give you access to the full table of contents as outlined in the table of contents at the beginning of each printed volume. This is the recommended method of navigating from point to point in our version of WBC.

One more note on the WBC, if you have your main window and split window set up to track along with each other, moving the text in the other window will take you back to beginning of that section in the commentary.  You can turn off the setting that sets windows to follow one another, which is recommended when using the WBC alongside another text.

As you can see, the Word Biblical Commentary is a massive collection of great resources enhanced by The Bible Study App.  Right now, the entire 59 Volume set is on sale for $299.99. The sale price for the Word Biblical Commentary set is available now through the end of the day Monday, April 15.  Be sure to check it out!

Do you have any tips on using the Word Biblical Commentary?  How have you used it to enhance your Bible Study?

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