Posts tagged Look Inside

Look Inside: ESV Greek-English Interlinear New Testament

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With our newest App update to iOS 5.9 we can now offer Interlinear Bibles!  What’s an interlinear Bible you ask?  An interlinear Bible typically is the Hebrew or Greek text of the Old or New Testament with a literal English translation between the lines of the original-language text.  This is an extremely helpful Bible Study tool, especially for those wanting to dig deeper into original Bible language studies.

Here’s a brief look inside the ESV Greek-English Interlinear New Testament. (Screenshots are taken from an iPad 2, click for a larger view)

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Not only can The Bible Study App display the text in an Interlinear format, we’ve tagged the Greek word with the Greek Parsing and Strong’s Definition: Simply tap a word to get more details on that Greek word.

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We’ve also tagged the English Word:

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And the Strong’s Number:

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Searching for this Greek word in the text? No problem. Tap search and The Bible Study App will bring you a list of results for that Greek Word:

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You can also tap “lookup” and The Bible Study App will find dictionaries already downloaded to your device that contain more information on this Greek word:

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You can also search the Greek word in the same form as the word you’ve tapped:

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Or, you can search for all Greek words in the same form as the word you’ve tapped:

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We’re really excited about the release of the Greek-Interlinears!  To celebrate their release, we’re offering great discounts on the ESV, NKJV, and KJV Greek-English Interlinear New Testament Bibles!

Look Inside: Understanding The Bible Commentary Series

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The Understanding The Bible Commentary Series is now complete and consists of 36 volumes spanning the entire Old Testament and New Testament.

Each volume in the Understanding the Bible Commentary Series breaks down the barriers between the ancient and modern worlds so that the power and meaning of the biblical texts become transparent to contemporary readers. They present a careful section-by-section exposition of the biblical books with key terms and phrases highlighted and all Hebrew transliterated.

(screenshot below is of The Bible Study App on PC, click for larger view)

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Notes at the close of each chapter provide additional textual and technical comments for those who want to dig deeper. A bibliography as well as Scripture and subject indexes are also included. Pastors, students, and Bible teachers will find in this series a commitment to accessibility without sacrificing serious scholarship.

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Get the entire Understanding The Bible Commentary Series here!

 

Watch the video below to hear more about The Understanding The Bible Commentary series.

Bible Concordances in The Bible Study App

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A Bible Concordance is an alphabetical list that shows where specific words appear in the Bible.

In The Bible Study App you can use a concordance as a standalone resource or access it by looking up a word in the Bible text you’re reading.

Watch the video below to see how they work in the App!

Browse available Concordances here!

Bibles tagged with Strong’s numbers

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Bible tagged with Strong’s numbers is one of the most powerful and easy to use study tools available for The Bible Study App!
Watch the short video below to see how a Strong’s tagged Bible works and check out the links below to add one to your study library.

 

You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App. Try it yourself by downloading a free demo HERE or see what Bible translations are available with Strong’s in the list below.

Current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Look Inside: New Bible Commentary & Dictionary

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For many years the New Bible Commentary and New Bible Dictionary have served Bible readers worldwide. We’ve enhanced these great resources for The Bible Study App.

Here’s how: (screenshots are from an iPad 2 – click on an image for a expanded view):

ONE: Resource Guide

Open your favorite Bible in the main window. (I’ve got the ESV open in this example.)  Tap the split window handle and drag it to a width or height you like.  As I scroll through the Bible text, the resource guide keeps up with me and searches through all the books in my library for content related to the Scripture passage in the main window.

If you scroll down the Resource Guide results, you will see the section headings “Commentaries”, “People,” “Places,” and “Topics.”

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Tap or click on the New Bible Commentary for the content relevant to the passage you are reading.  With The Bible Study App, the scripture references are hyperlinked within the commentary text. All I have to do is tap the scripture reference to read it instantly.  You can also view the new maps, diagrams, charts and tables that are included with each article.

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For the New Bible Dictionary content, choose the person/place/topic you want to learn more about.  I chose “Aristarchus” in this example.  The Bible Study App then brings you results from within the New Bible Dictionary.  After you’ve tapped on the New Bible Dictionary, you can scroll down and read the entire article without having to leave your Bible text.

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You can also tap the top right-hand corner of the pop-up window to bring up the option to open these hyperlinked references in the main window or the split window.

TWO: “Traditional Uses” 

You can also utilize the New Bible Dictionary as a traditional dictionary in The Bible Study App.  Just Tap/Click the “Go-To” button and scroll through this awesome resource as you would a hard-copy encyclopedia.

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As well as read the New Bible Commentary in the split window to follow along with the passage you are studying.

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iOS EXTRA #1: Lookup Feature

In iPhone/iPad app, you also have two additional options.  Tap and hold a word in the Bible text and an option menu bar will pop up.  From here you get the options to Copy, Highlight, Note, Bookmark, Share, Define, Lookup and More.  Tap “Lookup” and you’ll find the New Bible Dictionary “hit” there that you can tap and read without having to leave your Bible text.

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iOS EXTRA #2: Resource Guide on a Verse

Tap and hold a word in the Bible text and an option menu bar will pop up. From here you get the options to Tap and hold on a verse number and an option menu bar will pop up. From here you get the options Copy, Highlight, add a Note, Bookmark, Share, Guide, and More.  Here you can see the relevant content for the New Bible Commentary, and the hits on the people/places/topics and relevant articles from the New Bible Dictionary.

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As you can see, the New Bible Commentary and New Bible Dictionary are great resources that will help you deepen your Bible study.  You can find the New Bible Commentary and New Bible Dictionary as stand-alone resources on the Olive Tree store, or save more by bundling the New Bible Commentary and New Bible Dictionary together.

New Title: Astonished by Mike Erre

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We’re trilled to announce the release of a new title to The Bible Study App: Astonished: Recapturing the Wonder, Awe, and Mystery of Life with God by Mike Erre.  In Astonished, Pastor Mike Erre calls Christians away from simplistic formulas to honest and rugged faith in the mysterious and unpredictable God.

Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 8 of this brand new title:

The disciples give me a great deal of hope. They weren’t particularly bright or faith-filled or quick to learn; they were, in the words of Luke, “unschooled, ordinary men” who were consistently rebuked for missing the point of Jesus’s teaching and ministry. At one point in His ministry, however, they got it. Jesus had just asked them who they thought He was. Peter, responding for the group, said that Jesus was the promised Christ, the one the Jews had been waiting for. Jesus affirmed His words and pointed out that Peter didn’t come to this conclusion on his own but that this had been revealed to him from heaven. But then Jesus did something quite interesting—He commanded them to tell no one who He was. Why? You’d think it was at that point in His ministry he’d want people to know.

The reason Jesus commanded silence was that though they had figured out He was the Messiah, they had no idea what His messiah-ship entailed:

From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life.

Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. “Never, Lord!” he said. “This shall never happen to you!”

Jesus turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”

Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and

take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it. What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul? (Matt. 16:21–26)

The minute the disciples understood Jesus to be the Messiah, He revealed to them that He must suffer. But this violated the number- one rule in the Messiah playbook—messiahs don’t suffer and die. Crucifixion is what happened to failed messiahs. In the Jewish con- ception of God’s rescuer, the Messiah was to restore Israel’s fortunes through the defeat of Rome and the gentile nations. This was so offensive to Jewish sensibilities that Peter took it upon himself to rebuke Jesus.

On at least three separate occasions, Jesus told His followers to be prepared for His suffering at the hands of gentiles. It was impossible for them to grasp what He had in mind, so He used the image of His impending crucifixion as picture of what was expected of those who will follow Him. “Taking up [one’s] cross” was a renunciation of one’s rights in the first century. Only criminals would take up a cross in Jewish society. Your friends and family would be dead to you. Your life as you had known it was over. Jesus calls His followers to carry their crosses as he carried His. For some of His earliest followers, that meant a literal martyr’s death. For most of us, that death won’t be so literal, but it is true regardless. To follow Jesus is to prepare yourself to die.  Your self, your privileges, your entitlements—all are surrendered in order to follow Christ. We think the cross is the place where Jesus died. But is a place where we die too. The self must die. That doesn’t mean you lose your personality or cannot enjoy anything. It means your desires don’t rule you any more. They are submitted to something bigger.

But we are consumers at heart; our lives are built on the foundation of self-indulgence and gratification. “What do I want?” and “What do I need?” are the twin questions that drive us. Jesus summons us to abandon the project of finding life through what Jesus calls the “self ”—the way of living characterized by exalting self, glorifying self, promoting self, all in the strength of self—that project must be put to death in order to follow Jesus. What has to die is every impulse to assume authority and control over our own lives.

Jesus wants us to surrender our lives to Him and follow Him into the unknown. And if it means a life of suffering, hardship, and disappointment, it will be worth it, because following Him is better than living with everything in the world minus Him. That is what it means to say that He is the treasure. Have we become so refined and civilized that the benefits of our faith have become more precious and more valuable than Jesus Himself?

Faith in Jesus demands surrender. There is no other way around it. The path to the life Jesus offers is cross-shaped. To receive His gift, we must release our grip on everything else. The gift is free, but it costs us everything.

Mike Erre is the lead pastor of the First Evangelical Free Church of Fullerton (evfreefullerton.com).

Get Astonished: Recapturing the Wonder, Awe, and Mystery of Life with God by Mike Erre HERE.
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