Tag Archive: split window

Three ways to use the Split Window

Posted by on 02/27/2017 in:

Whether you’re on a phone or tablet, one of the main Bible study features of the Olive Tree Bible App is the split window.

In this blog, we’ll show you three ways you can use the split window for your Android smartphone, tablet, or Kindle Fire.
(Click here for iOS.)

First, to access the three features of the split window, do this:

Now you will see three different features you can access in the split window.

1. The first and most popular is the Resource Guide

The Resource Guide is your personal Bible study assistant. It looks to the main window of the app and pulls in relevant study helps such as people, places, topics, cross references, commentary notes, maps, and more. The more resources you have in your library, the more powerful the Resource Guide will be. Watch this video to see the Resource Guide in action.

2. My Stuff

Selecting ‘My Stuff’ allows you to access your notes, highlights, tags, notifications and more. A personal favorite is having my notes open in the split window next to my Bible text. Whether you’re journaling during your own devotion time or taking notes from the text as your pastor is speaking, having the ability to take notes in the split window is a convenient feature.

3. Library

This is the easiest way to set up a parallel Bible or put your commentary notes next to your text. Simply select a resource from your library and it will be side by side with whatever title you have open in the main window. If it’s an ‘enhanced resource’ like another Bible or study Bible notes, it will stay in sync with the resource in the main window.

If you are a regular user of any of these features in the split window, we’d love to hear what your favorite is. Comment below to share!

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Six ways to use the Split Window

Posted by on 02/27/2017 in:

Whether you’re on a phone or tablet, one of the main Bible study features of the Olive Tree Bible App is the split window.

In this blog, we’ll show you six ways you can use the split window for your iPhone or iPad.
(Click here for Android.)

First, to access the six features of the split window do this:

Once you tap the ‘More’ button, you will see six different features you can access in the split window.

1. The first and most popular is the Resource Guide

The Resource Guide is your personal Bible study assistant. It looks to the main window of the app and pulls in relevant study helps such as people, places, topics, cross references, commentary notes, maps, and more. The more resources you have in your library, the more powerful the Resource Guide will be.

2. Recently Opened

This feature allows you to quickly view a list of recently-opened resources. Whether you were recently reading another Bible translation or a Christian eBook, you can quickly pull it up in the split window here.

3. Library Favorites

This list is curated by you and chosen from your library. When you tap ‘Library Favorites’, you will see your current list and you’ll have the option to add or remove titles.

4. Open Library

This is the easiest way to set up a parallel Bible or put your commentary notes right next to your Bible text. Simply select an additional resource from your library and it will be side by side with whatever title you have open in the main window. If it’s an ‘enhanced resource’ like another Bible or study notes it will stay in sync with the resource in the main window.

5. My Notes

One of my personal favorites is having my notes open in the split window. Whether you’re journaling during your own devotion time or taking notes from the text as your pastor is speaking, having the ability to take notes in the split window is a convenient feature.

6. Add Note

Tap this option to create a note. You can connect it to the Scripture you’re reading in the main window by tag or category.

If you are a regular user of any of these features in the split window, we’d love to hear what your favorite is. Comment below to share!

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How to Use God’s Commentary on Scripture

Posted by on 04/10/2015 in: , ,

By Olive Tree Employee: David Mikucki

Olive Tree has a lot of commentaries and study Bibles available, and I love using them. I find myself using one almost every day, even if it’s only to get background information on a verse as I read each day. The Resource Guide makes it easy to do just that. I can’t even imagine trying to carry Calvin’s 22-volume commentary set or even the hefty ESV Study Bible with me everywhere.

But as I’m sure you’re aware, commentaries and study Bibles can get things wrong. Theologians and scholars make mistakes and misinterpret things, but God is perfect and doesn’t make any mistakes. Wouldn’t it be great if God had written a commentary on Scripture? Well, in a way He did, and His commentary comes free with The Bible Study App. Let me explain what I mean…

Interpreting Scripture with Scripture

frustrationIt has been said that Scripture is its own best interpreter, and that’s absolutely true. It has also been said that when we’re having trouble interpreting a text that seems unclear, the best place we can go is to clearer texts that talk about the same subject. So when Jesus speaks in a parable, it can be very helpful to see what Paul had to say about the subject. That can help to guard us from error as we seek to understand the meaning of difficult passages. In this sense, God gives us commentary on Scripture through other Scripture.

Before I used The Bible Study App, I would do this by looking at the tiny cross-references in my Bible text, then I would try to keep my finger where I started as I used my other hand to look up the cross-references—leaving a finger at each cross reference. That got pretty crazy pretty quick since I only have ten fingers. Besides that, what about keeping my place in commentaries?

Thankfully, Olive Tree offers a few features that make this a lot easier.

Cross Reference Popups

Several of the translations Olive Tree offers (like the ESV and the NIV) have cross-references built right into the Bible text. Cross-references are references to verses that the translators thought were related to the verse you’re reading. They look like little superscripted letters. When you tap them, you see popup that shows you the cross references related to that verse:

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The list of cross-references, of course, isn’t inspired. But Scripture is inspired and the cross references are designed to take you to places in Scripture that are related to the passage you’re reading. In the example below, I was reading the story of Cain and Abel in Genesis 4, and I found a cross-reference where Hebrews gives us some extra insight into this story:

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Two Passages Side-by-Side

If you want to dig into God’s commentary even more, you might find popups don’t show enough context and they can get in your way of reading the original passage. With split window, you can easily pull up two whole passages of Scripture side-by-side. First open split window by tapping on the arrow at the edge of your screen:

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This will probably bring up the Resource Guide, so tap Open at the top of the Resource Guide, then tap Recently Opened and select one your preferred Bible translations:

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By default, the split window is set to show the same passage that you have open in the main window so that you can compare translations, but if you disable window syncing, you can use the two screens as if they’re two separate Bibles. To do this, tap the [>>] icon at the top right of the split window, then tap Sync Settings and turn off Sync Windows:

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Now, you can open a passage that’s related to the one you’re currently reading. I’m in Jeremiah 31:31, reading about the New Covenant. Hebrews has a lot to say about this passage in chapters 8 and 10, so I’ll take my split window to Hebrews 8 by using the Go To button:

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Now I have both passages opened. I can read Scripture and God’s commentary on Scripture—more Scripture—right next to each other!

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Conclusion

I don’t consider my study of a passage complete until I’ve looked to see what God says about that passage elsewhere in His Word. These features make it a lot easier to do that. Another tool I often use is the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, which is a collection of cross-references that’s a bit larger than what you’ll find in a Bible translation. It’s quite useful and we’ve even written a blog post about how to use it.

The steps I showed you here were for iPad, but these things can be done on all of our platforms. You can learn about how to use split window and lots of other features for all our supported platforms on our help website.

David is a front end web developer at Olive Tree. He also writes on his personal blog, And the Rest of It.

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