Posts tagged Strong's

Bibles tagged with Strong’s numbers

1

Bible tagged with Strong’s numbers is one of the most powerful and easy to use study tools available for The Bible Study App!
Watch the short video below to see how a Strong’s tagged Bible works and check out the links below to add one to your study library.

 

You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App. Try it yourself by downloading a free demo HERE or see what Bible translations are available with Strong’s in the list below.

Current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Get the Most out of your ESV with Strong’s

3

By Olive Tree Employee: David Mikucki

If you haven’t already downloaded it, we’re giving away the ESV with Strong’s for free through April 21st! All you have to do is share the link and you’ll get a free download.

The great part about this resource is that anyone can use it. You don’t need to be seminary trained or have years of experience. You can just tap and read. The tool is powerful and practical enough to be useful even for personal study.

As with many powerful tools, this resource can do more if you know how to use it. It can also be somewhat dangerous if you don’t know how to use it. We don’t just want to provide you with the resource; we want to help you get the most out of it and avoid the dangers of misinterpretation. In this post, we’ll talk about the basic features of the ESV with Strong’s and about how to get the most out of each of them.

Tap to See Greek/Hebrew Word

The first feature is the most obvious. As soon as you tap, you can see what Greek or Hebrew word is behind it. This is the first thing you’ll see when you tap on a word. It’s probably most helpful for people who know Greek or Hebrew.

Screen1

Now, if you tap on a darker word and it doesn’t open to do anything, that means that the word isn’t explicitly in the Greek or Hebrew text. The word was added by the translators in order to help the sentence make sense. We do this all the time in English, leaving out words because they’re assumed. Of course, the words left out in Greek aren’t necessarily the words we can leave out in English. Different languages have different rules for what’s important and what can be left out.

The takeaway here is that, while a word might not be in the original Greek or Hebrew, that doesn’t mean the word isn’t implied by other words. Sometimes the translators of the ESV add those words so that we English readers won’t be left scratching our heads.

Enhanced Strong’s Dictionary

The Enhanced Strong’s Dictionary is what appears when you tap a word that does have a Greek or Hebrew word behind it. This is a really handy tool because it will show you all the ways that the word gets translated throughout the Bible and give you an idea of how common each translation is. This can give you a fuller idea of what the word meant in the original language.

Screen2

The thing to keep in mind here is something that all languages share in common: just because a word can mean something in one place, doesn’t mean it means that thing everywhere else. How and where a word is used in a sentence, paragraph, chapter, and book is a critical part of understanding what the word means.

Many words in English have several diverse meanings. For example, the word “dodge” can mean to get out of the way of something. It can also mean to lighten part of an image or photo (like the “dodge brush” in image editing programs). If you were to simply look up the dictionary definition and pick the first one, you could find yourself very confused. Another example is the English word “love.” When someone says “I love ice cream,” he means something very different from when he says “I love my wife” (or at least he ought to).

The point here is that we want to let the dictionary help us get an idea of what the word can mean, then let the context of the passage determine what the word does mean. If we’re in a class on photography, “dodge” probably doesn’t mean “get out of the way.” It probably means “lighten.” But we wouldn’t want to make that assumption in gym class.

View All Occurrences

This is probably my favorite feature in The Bible Study App for word studies. It’s the button that says “Search for g5457” (or some other number). This feature allows you to search for everywhere in the Bible where that particular Greek or Hebrew word is used. Since a translation might translate one word twelve different ways, it’s hard to know when that word is being used. But this feature can help.

Screen3

The best way to use this feature is to start with where the word is used closest to the verse you’re studying, then work outward from there. Look in the verse, then the chapter, then the book, then other books the author has written, then in the whole Bible.

In this way you can get a sense for how a certain author used a particular word in its context, in all his writings, and how the word gets used throughout the whole Bible. While this doesn’t necessarily result in the same mastery of the word that a scholar might have, it certainly does help us to better understand the word and the passage we found it in.

Generally speaking, this isn’t going to completely change the way you read a passage of Scripture. The translators know the languages a lot better than most of us, so most often we’ll end up agreeing. But doing a word study can help us discover a richness to the word that we otherwise might not have seen. It can also help us to connect things in Scripture that we otherwise might not have thought to connect.

Look Up Word in Dictionaries

Screen4

The Look Up feature allows you to look up a word in any Greek/Hebrew dictionaries that you might have. There are a lot of really helpful dictionaries out there by scholars who have already done the work of a detailed word study. They may also include information about where the word came from and how it was used in books outside the Bible. These can be extremely helpful to supplement the word studies that you’re already doing with the ESV with Strong’s. Here are a few you might find helpful:

Conclusion

Tools like the ESV with Strong’s and Bible dictionaries can be really helpful in understanding what God has to say. We should pray that, in our study, we will allow God to correct us with what we learn about the words of Scripture. This is very different from using the tools to bend God’s words to mean what we want them to. Humility and openness to correction are important here.

If we come to the Scriptures with our tools, ready to be taught by the Scriptures, then we will be in the right place to see God’s love for us in Christ and how we are to live in light of that love. We hope these tools prove helpful in your studies.

Psalm 119:130 (ESV)

The unfolding of your words gives light;

it imparts understanding to the simple

 

What does Amen mean?

0

There are quite a few words that you’ll only ever hear in church. For instance, you’ll often hear invitations to a ‘fellowship’ activity announced on a Sunday morning, but the chances are you won’t use the word fellowship to invite your friend over for a BBQ or to watch the Super Bowl. One word that is used today, in churches all around the world, is the word Amen. Although many people use it in the right context, some may not actually know what it means. So what does the word Amen actually mean?

 

 

Amen is an ancient Hebrew word and is primarily used in three ways in the scriptures:

At the beginning of a discourse/statement/sermon. In these cases Amen would often mean (and be translated) as verily, or truly.

  • Matthew 5:18 is an example of this:
    “For truly [Amen], I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.”

In the Old Testament it’s also used as a descriptor of the character of God being true and/or faithful.

  • Deuteronomy 7:9 says, “Know therefore that the Lord your God is God, the faithful [Amen]God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, to a thousand generations.”
    See also: Isa. 49:7, 65:16.

The most common placement of Amen is at the end of a prayer, sermon, or statement - as an agreement. It could then be translated as ‘so be it’, ‘so it is’,  or ‘may it be fulfilled’. These still have the similar ideas of truth, faith, or belief in.

  •  The Bible actually ends with this affirmation in Revelation 22:20-21: “He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come Lord Jesus! The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen.”

So, while many people haven’t researched the Hebrew roots, chances are, most have always had a basic understanding of what Amen means and have been using it in the right context. Hopefully this helps give you a bit larger picture of the meaning and you can shout, “Amen” with more authority the next time your Pastor is preaching.

If you’re interested in doing similar word studies on your own, consider buying a Bible with Strong’s or a Bible Dictionary like Vine’s that make word study as easy as a click or tap in The Bible Study App.

Right now we’re doing a special giveaway and you can get the ESV with Strong’s for free.

Go here to get it now!

 

 

 

What is a Strong’s Tagged Bible?

19

The well-known Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance lists all the significant words in the Bible and references each word to the original Hebrew and Greek languages. The concordance was first published in 1890 by Dr. James Strong, whose life’s work was to provide students of the Bible with an accurate and functional tool to understand the Bible’s original languages. He and others worked on the list for 35 years!

Dr. Strong’s work is still universally recognized as one of the essential aids for studying the Bible and thanks to The Bible Study App it’s easier than ever to access for deeper study of the Bible. Here’s a brief demonstration of how it works. All screenshots are from The Bible Study App on an Android tablet.

To find out the Hebrew or Greek word behind the English translation simply tap a word on any Strong’s tagged Bible.
(Click here for a list of available Bible’s with Strong’s tagging).

Strongs1

In the above screen shot I’ve tapped the word ‘nations’ found in Matthew 28:18 and I see that the Greek word is ‘ethnos’. I can then look up that Greek word in my other library resources like a concordance or dictionary by tapping the Lookup button in the popup window.

strongs2

With a concordance I can see all of the different place that word is listed and how it is translated. In this case ‘ethnos’ is often translated as Gentiles in other places in Matthew.

strongs-dictionaryI can also look the word up in a dictionary like Vine’s or Mounce’s Expository Dictionary to see further explanation.

strongs-mounce

Lastly, if you would like to see or hide the actual Strong’s numbers associated with the words, you can turn this feature on or off by tapping Settings>Advanced Settings> Other Settings (Text Layout/Display for iOS)>Strong’s Numbers.

This is how the text would look with Strong’s numbers viewable compared with the first image in this post which hides the numbers.

Show Strong's Numbers

You can see how powerful and easy it is to use a Strong’s tagged Bible for The Bible Study App.

Right now you can get the ESV Bible with Strong’s for free! Click HERE.
Here are the current Bible translations available with Strong’s tagging:

Exclusive Giveaway!

19
Now thru April 21 we are giving away the ESV Bible with Strong’s tagging for free!

The ESV with Strong’s allows you to instantly access the Hebrew or Greek word behind the English translation with a simple tap. It’s an outstanding resource for deeper word study and for a limited time it’s free to users of The Bible Study App!

Tap the image below to go to our special giveaway page and add the ESV with Strong’s to your account.

esv blog image

Three Strong’s Bibles Quick Tips

3

The Strong’s Concordance matches every word in the King James Bible to the word it came from in the original Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek. Olive Tree’s Bible Study App has integrated Strong’s numbers to work with the ESV, KJV, HCSB, NKJVNASB, and the Almeida Revista e Atualizada (RA) translations of the Bible.

I recently found the integrated Strong’s function particularly helpful when reading John 21:5 Jesus said to them, “Children, do you have any fish?”  Since I normally read the NIV in my devotional time, I was puzzled by the use of the word “children” in this passage as the NIV Translation uses the word “Friends”.  So, I wanted to do a quick study to find out more.

Here’s three quick tips that helped me discover more about the translation behind this word. (Screenshots are taken with the ESV with Strong’s on an iPad, but will work with any of the Translations mentioned above and all supported devices.)

Strong’s Pop-Ups

IMG_0377

Open the your Bible with Strong’s and you’ll see that some words are a slightly different color. Tapping or clicking on those words will pop-up the Strong’s information for that word. These pop-ups contain a wealth of information, including:

  1. The Strong’s number (beginning with either a “g” or an “h”) for that word.
  2. A short definition for that word.
  3. An outlined list of the different meanings for that word in the original language.
  4. Often you will also find that another Strong’s number is included as a link. These can be similar words that you can compare or other words from which your current word selection derives its meaning.

You can also go to your settings in the The Bible Study App and turn on the setting to show Strong’s Numbers (iOS = Settings – Advanced Settings – Text Layout / Display; for Android = Settings – Other Settings). The numbers for the words will appear in the Bible text. Tapping on the number will also bring up the Strong’s pop-up.

IMG_0378

Look-Up Options

At the bottom of the Strong’s pop-up, there are two buttons that perform “look-ups” or searches based on the Strong’s number or the word in its original language.

Look-up by Strong’s Number

The first button contains the Strong’s number for your word. Clicking or tapping on this button will perform a search in your library for articles containing this Strong’s number.

IMG_0380

Look-up by Original Language

The second button contains the word in its original language. Clicking or tapping on this word will perform a search in your library for articles about the word in its original language.

IMG_0382

Using the Search Function

Strong’s tagged Bibles can quickly create a very accurate concordance. By entering the Strong’s number into the search bar at the top right of the The Bible Study App, you can easily find all of the places within the Bible where that specific word is used. This is different than searching for the word in its English form.

Secondly, when you have a Strong’s pop-up open, you can select the word as it appears in its original language form, like αγάπη, and copy and paste it into your search bar to find all of the places in the Greek text were this Greek word appears.

IMG_0383

I also love using the Strong’s Bibles on my iPhone.  It’s a fantastic resource when I’m at church, small group, or on the go.

iPhone_strong's pop up

Bibles tagged with Strong’s Numbers are excellent resources for diving deeper into the biblical text. It offers insight into the original languages of Scripture without requiring you to have any formal training in Greek or Hebrew.  Be sure to check out these great resources on sale this week.

Go to Top