Posts tagged The Bible Study App

Advanced Bible Study with The Bible Study App

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Have you ever thought about preaching or leading a Bible study from your iPad or mobile device? What about preparing a study on that same device? If the answer is yes, then this is a video you’ll want to watch.

In this video Olive Tree employee LaRosa Johnson shows you how to use the Olive Tree Bible Study app to do, what he likes to call, advanced Bible study. LaRosa will walk you through the steps of studying the Bible and taking notes using the same steps that he uses when he is getting ready to preach a sermon. After watching this video you’ll be equipped with the tools you need to do in-depth Bible study using the Bible Study app, whether you’re preaching or doing it for personal study.

Using the NA28 in The Bible Study App

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By Olive Tree Staff: Matthew Jonas

Many features of The Bible Study App make the NA-28 easier to use, but using certain features of the text and the apparatus can still be confusing.  With that in mind, I’d like to explain how to do a few basic things with the NA-28 text with Critical Apparatus and Mounce parsings, available through the Bible Study App.  We also offer the NA28 with critical apparatus (but no parsings), and the NA28 with parsings (but no apparatus).  If you have one of these texts, you may still find this article helpful, but not all of the information will apply to the particular text that you have.

Using the Parsings
Accessing a parsing in the Bible Study App is as simple as tapping on a word.  A popup should then appear displaying the dictionary form of the word, followed by a link to a Greek-English dictionary, followed by a gloss, then the parsing information.  The parsing information is stored in the form of a code which is written out fully immediately below.android-morph

One feature that many users are not aware of is that the Bible Study App supports searching for specific forms of words by using these codes.  To do so, first check the “options” when you initiate a search.  You will need to have a parsed text open, and you will also need to switch the “search options” to “Search on Morphology.  Next, type in the dictionary form of the word, followed by the @ symbol, followed by the appropriate parsing code.  For example, searching for ἀγάπη@NNFS would return all occurrences of the noun ἀγάπη in the nominative singular.

At the bottom of the pop-up window, there is also a “lookup” button.  This queries other dictionaries in your library to find out if they have any articles about that word.  If they do, they will show up in the results.  Tapping on one will open that article in the popup window.  Often at this point, I will tap on the “tear out” button and choose to open the dictionary in the split window in order to read it more easily.  When I’m done, I simply tap the slider bar, which closes the split window.  The resource is still open there if I want to access it again, but it is out of view while I continue my reading.  If I want to open an article on another word, I repeat the process that I just outlined rather than opening the dictionary and trying to navigate to the entry I want.

Using the Critical Apparatus
There are two ways to access the critical apparatus in the Bible Study App.  The first is to tap on one of the text-critical symbols in the Greek text.  This will open the apparatus in a popup window to the corresponding location.  If you wish to keep the apparatus open in the split window, tap on the “tear-out” icon and select “open in split window”.android-criticalapp

I have pretty large fingers and find that I only hit the symbol about half the time.  When working with a parsed text, this can be obnoxious since I generally end up hitting the word and getting the parsing info rather than the apparatus.  In order to facilitate more easily opening the apparatus, we have included it as a separate item in your library.  This means that you can also get to it by opening the split window, clicking on the library button, and choosing the NA-28 Critical Apparatus from your library.

The critical apparatus has been “versified” which means that it will follow the main window (as long as your settings are set up this way).  It also means that when you tap on the “navigate” button that you will see the familiar verse chooser rather than a table of contents.  If the apparatus is left open in the split window with the Greek text in the main window, it will follow along as you read through a passage, providing an effect similar to reading from the print edition.

Probably the greatest obstacle to using the critical apparatus is becoming familiar with all of the symbols that it uses.  Unfortunately, we do not have these all tagged at this point, which means that there is no simple way to access the meanings.  However, we do include the introduction to the NA-28, which includes the definitions.  These are listed under “III. THE CRITICAL APPARATUS” in the introduction.  A simple hack which makes it much easier to jump to this section is to add a bookmark at this location.  It will then show up under the “My Stuff” menu in your bookmarks.  While this is not an ideal solution, it does help a lot when trying to look up symbols or abbreviations.  In fact, you could bookmark the sub-sections as well to make it even easier to get to exactly where you want each time.

See all Greek & Hebrew titles available for The Bible Study App HERE.

 

 

Windows 8 The Bible Study App Update

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Olive Tree recently released an update to The Bible Study App on Windows 8.  I sat down with Adam, our lead Windows 8 developer, to talk about the update.

Monty: How is the Windows 8 app different from the Windows 7 desktop version?

Adam: The Windows Store app targets a fast and fluid experience across a wide range of devices, where the Desktop app has an eye for much more advanced Bible Study that can require more processing.

Thus far the Windows Store app has worked well as a basic Bible reader, but that is only the beginning. We recently updated the app to add popups for footnotes and Bible references, and will be continuing to build it into an incredible experience for even more advanced users.

Monty: Why use the Windows 8 app?

Adam: My favorite reason is the speed, even on my tablet. I’m not an advanced user, so having a Bible app that I can easily snap to the side of the screen during church while I take notes in OneNote makes for a great experience for me.

Monty: What are the top features of the Windows 8 app?

Adam: Right now, I get really excited when using the Search screens, both for the view of results in all my books, but also to easily navigate the results within a specific book. We have also leveraged common Windows 8 features like Semantic Zoom and the app bar to filter and navigate through the results quickly.would say the top features are the search and reading experience.

With reading, I’ve already mentioned the performance. The responsiveness when scrolling is, I believe, unparalleled by any of our other apps. It makes it a real joy to use, especially because the text just plain looks great!

Monty: What’s new in the Windows 8 app?

Adam: We recently updated the app to include popups on footnotes and verse references. This is particularly important to me because it’s the first step beyond a “simple” Bible reader. This past Sunday in church I was able to jump ahead of the pastor as he called out a cross reference because I saw the footnote and could open the location in the popup.

Monty: Anything else you would like to add?

Adam: We are working hard to enable the rest of our available titles in the Windows Store app. I’m excited to see the continued interest in what we’re doing on Windows, and for the opportunity to keep working at making it better!

Thanks Adam!  Go here to find our newest Windows 8 release for the Bible Study App, or search “Bible+” in the Windows Store.

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